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Google Unveils 72-Qubit Quantum Computer With Low Error Rates Anonymous 03/14/2018 (Wed) 16:53:47 [Preview] No. 12480 [Reply] [Last 50 Posts]
>Google announced a 72-qubit universal quantum computer that promises the same low error rates the company saw in its first 9-qubit quantum computer. Google believes that this quantum computer, called Bristlecone, will be able to bring us to an age of quantum supremacy.

>Ready For Quantum Supremacy

>Google has teased before that it would build a 49-qubit quantum computer to achieve “quantum supremacy.” This achievement would show that quantum computers can perform some well-defined science problems faster than the fastest supercomputers in the world can.

>In a recent announcement, Google said:

> If a quantum processor can be operated with low enough error, it would be able to outperform a classical supercomputer on a well-defined computer science problem, an achievement known as quantum supremacy. These random circuits must be large in both number of qubits as well as computational length (depth).

> Although no one has achieved this goal yet, we calculate quantum supremacy can be comfortably demonstrated with 49 qubits, a circuit depth exceeding 40, and a two-qubit error below 0.5%. We believe the experimental demonstration of a quantum processor outperforming a supercomputer would be a watershed moment for our field, and remains one of our key objectives.

>Not long after Google started talking about its 49-qubit quantum computer, IBM showed that for some specific quantum applications, 56 qubits or more may be needed to prove quantum supremacy. It seems Google wanted to remove all doubt, so now it’s experimenting with a 72-qubit quantum computer.

>Don’t let the numbers fool you, though. Right now, the most powerful supercomputers can simulate only 46 qubits and for every new qubit that needs to be simulated, the memory requirements typically double (although some system-wide efficiency can be gained with new innovations).

>Therefore, in order for us to simulate a 72-qubit quantum computer, we’d need millions of times more RAM (2^(72-46)). We probably won’t be able to use that much RAM in a supercomputer anytime soon, so if Bristlecone will be able to run any algorithm faster than our most powerful supercomputers, then the quantum supremacy era will have arrived.

Message too long. Click here to view full text.



Anonymous 03/14/2018 (Wed) 16:57:28 [Preview] No.12481 del
Can't post archive link because of the retarded flood system, so fill in the blanks if you are interested.

archive (dot) fo (slash) iOzNq



(42.55 KB 682x394 hp_botnet_edited.png)
HP Botnet Anonymous 02/26/2018 (Mon) 07:24:17 [Preview] No. 12425 [Reply] [Last 50 Posts]
The amount of analysis a fucking printer company is doing is rather disturbing.
1 post and 1 image omitted.


Anonymous 02/27/2018 (Tue) 09:46:17 [Preview] No.12430 del
>>12425
>job at HebrewPrinting
Jel.
Notice the 'Imaging and Printing' positions are in shit locations. Fits the job well.
>Analysis
Only if networked, anon.
Open the printer and fix it.
Or build your own libre printer
It should fit 11w sheets so both 8x11 and 11x17 can be printed


Anonymous 02/27/2018 (Tue) 09:49:20 [Preview] No.12431 del
>>12426
>usage stats
>unencrypted
Be sure to "correct" your usage, anon.


Anonymous 03/01/2018 (Thu) 21:53:46 [Preview] No.12436 del
>>12426
Also during 2018-2019 massive computer security breaches are expected -more cataclysmic than previously (from forecasts a decade in advance based on tech trends). I suspect it will be due to broken AES. NIST are opening up to PQC already which is a portent of a cryptographic SHTF scenario.
We've already seen indications of these breaches with Meltdown, Spectre, and Wifi in 2017. I'm cutting out those odd accounts hardly/never used that could possibly be part of a leveraged attack on main accounts.
Cloud data users are set to get rained on, hard.

>>12430
>Open the printer and fix it.
Printers also doxx you on the printout (with the infamous yellow dots on color printers for example). There is also reason to believe there are fingerprinting methods used in monochrome printers. Such devices are a double-ended botnet.


Anonymous 03/14/2018 (Wed) 17:35:20 [Preview] No.12482 del
Just audit the documents and hand type them to airgapped and TEMPEST resistant computers. This is how they do it in nuclear reactors, and presumably at CIA offices with high(est) clearance requirement.


Anonymous 03/15/2018 (Thu) 12:47:11 [Preview] No.12484 del
Well they named the company after HP Lovecraft so analyze that. If you install kubuntu on an HP machine a dream watchdog daemon initializes. And there is no htop for your mind.



Is Signal a threat to Free Software? Anonymous 07/09/2017 (Sun) 19:49:01 [Preview] No. 8917 [Reply] [Last 50 Posts]
https://blog.grobox.de/2016/is-signal-a-threat-to-free-software/

My opinion: the guy from LibreSignal was using the Signal servers, consuming their energy, and using their marketing. This is not right.
About the Signal requirement to have google shit, it's very unfortunate. Though, people should just use other thing and stop all this buzz.
16 posts and 1 image omitted.


Anonymous 08/08/2017 (Tue) 11:30:01 [Preview] No. 10602 del
>>8931
They keep adevertising that end to end encryption but there's like one client that has it and that's the web/electron based on. The rest are useless, and as someone already mentioned in this thread it's not really federated at the moment.


Anonymous 08/08/2017 (Tue) 13:36:31 [Preview] No. 10604 del
>>8922
>the problem with tox is that anonymity was just an after thought
You're right on that. Tox was initiated on /g/ shortly after Snowden disclosures. It was made to be foss, distributed (so no servers are used) and provide strong encryption but anonymity hadn't been thought. It was added sometime after the project begun though. https://github.com/irungentoo/toxcore/blob/522f90fee138087db660dccc08413c53f388f604/docs/Prevent_Tracking.txt


Anonymous 03/07/2018 (Wed) 03:34:07 [Preview] No.12449 del
Signal is used by the same companies that were part of the PRISM program.

I won't be touching it. Smells funny.


Anonymous 03/07/2018 (Wed) 03:36:55 [Preview] No.12450 del
>>8931

Just as dumb. Anyone who would name their messenger/protocol RIOT is an idiot. Like the little shit who built a javascript encryption thing and named it Felony.


Anonymous 03/14/2018 (Wed) 16:42:24 [Preview] No.12479 del
Just communicate by vibrating air particles. This is also known as talking face to face. Features include:
-Absolutely no botnet
-Safe from CIAniggers (unless you talk to a CIAnigger)
-Audited and mathematically proven
-Messages are scrubbed the moment they are delivered
-Best security ever

And optional benefits:
-Socializing
-Satisfying the natural, human exposure quota
-Bitches



(387.89 KB 600x600 ralp.png)
Anonymous 03/12/2018 (Mon) 08:12:15 [Preview] No. 12464 [Reply] [Last 50 Posts]
i don't trust the data dumps that i've been finding through torch. can anyone point me to an onion site with some good data dumps?


Anonymous 03/12/2018 (Mon) 21:34:19 [Preview] No.12469 del
What kind of data? Specify.



(387.89 KB 600x600 ralp.png)
Anonymous 03/12/2018 (Mon) 08:01:22 [Preview] No. 12463 [Reply] [Last 50 Posts]
anyone have a site where I can look at data dumps? preferably an onion site



NIST finally is doing something on PQCrypto Anonymous 12/21/2017 (Thu) 23:41:39 [Preview] No. 12031 [Reply] [Last 50 Posts]
>Round 1 Submissions
> ht tps:// csrc.nist.gov/projects/post-quantum-cryptography/round-1-submissions

Keep looking. This is very important in case non-bullshit "quantum" computing really becomes a thing.

DjB submitted the "McEliece" and SPHINCS together with other academics:
> ht tps:// classic.mceliece.org/
> ht tps:// sphincs.org/

Inria (that developed Coq and others) worked on Big Quake:
> ht tps:// bigquake.inria.fr/

<can't paste links, shitty system detect as flood


Anonymous 12/22/2017 (Fri) 01:06:50 [Preview] No.12032 del
Protocol should be implied
csrc.nist.gov/projects/post-quantum-cryptography/round-1-submissions
classic.mceliece.org
sphincs.org
bigquake.inria.fr


Anonymous 02/28/2018 (Wed) 04:13:16 [Preview] No.12435 del
The same NIST that "allowed" the NOBUS EC backdoor.

The same NIST that concluded WTC Building Seven collapsed in < 5 seconds from an office fire.


Anonymous 03/05/2018 (Mon) 01:05:54 [Preview] No.12440 del
(20.33 KB 603x572 1519504859455.jpg)
>>12031
Honeypot. The US Government reserves the right to blackbox any patent its office labels as "significant"; consequently, I wouldn't trust contests they sponsor to design critical technologies if I was such a developer, especially not when the host doesn't believe in the technology being usable for everyone.

>in case non-bullshit "quantum" computing really becomes a thing.
It already is a thing. It just requires specialized facilities so needs to be used over the cloud.

https://youtube.com/watch?v=nQvTLgveUs8 [Embed]


Anonymous 03/07/2018 (Wed) 02:49:28 [Preview] No.12448 del
(1.79 MB 255x106 stop_it.gif)
>>12440
>the cloud



(28.29 KB 235x140 1491770426346.png)
Anonymous 12/10/2017 (Sun) 02:20:58 [Preview] No. 11890 [Reply] [Last 50 Posts]
Hi tech, i'm tired of windows.

I will go to linux, but I need know which linux i will usage.

I am in doubt between the backbox and Kali Linux, if you have more recommendations, I accept (debian priorizer).

I have a 4GB pendrive, is it enough to change the operating system?
21 posts and 1 image omitted.


Anonymous 02/15/2018 (Thu) 22:35:53 [Preview] No.12403 del
>>12402
OP might like parrotOS or Lionsec. Parrot has an everyday suite and is a pentesting distro. Same thing with Lionsec it is ubuntu with a shitload of tools.


Anonymous 02/16/2018 (Fri) 02:49:30 [Preview] No.12404 del
Get void linux


Anonymous 02/19/2018 (Mon) 06:18:36 [Preview] No.12407 del
Install gentoo. It's definetely worth the effort.


Anonymous 02/19/2018 (Mon) 16:57:10 [Preview] No.12410 del
>>11890
For anonymisation I suggest whonix
For penitration testing I suggest Backtrack 5r3
For personal use I suggest mint linux or arch linux
For linix hardware, if you want to leave microsoft i suggest System76
Or raspberry pi, pitop or piseed


Anonymous 03/01/2018 (Thu) 21:59:19 [Preview] No.12437 del
>>11890
Try the Live CD version of many distros without installing, until you find one you're happiest with.
Some distros are only 11Mb, others are larger than 4Gb so is case dependent whether it will fit a 4Gb USB drive.



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FLOSS and licensing Anonymous 07/31/2017 (Mon) 16:22:43 [Preview] No. 10510 [Reply] [Last 50 Posts]
Hello /tech/,

I'm not so familiar with software licenses so I started reading about the subject. At one point the question 'How does one profit from floss software?' popped in my head and these are some articles I came upon (quite outdated, but they still have a point). So GPL prevents companies from making proprietary software with your piece of software. BSD, on the other hand, does not (that's the case with Apple's kernel). Turns out the only way a company can profit from GPL license is by donations, offering support, teaching or dual licensing. Dual licensing seems like the most used option.

https://www.linuxjournal.com/article/5935
http://sealedabstract.com/rants/why-the-gpl-sucks/

>But there is a net effect on software development. Who makes money off GPL code? We go back to Novell and Red Hat, who test and package this software. And we see a trend–GPL code helps software testers make money. It helps QA people. It helps the people who answer the support phones. It helps everybody except software developers. Oh, maybe Google will pay them a salary as a goodwill gesture. But it’s really, really hard to make money from developing FOSS. You can make money supporting it. You can make money testing it. But no money developing it.

So my question is - does free software actually benefit the developer?
13 posts omitted.


Anonymous 02/20/2018 (Tue) 05:01:03 [Preview] No.12413 del
>>10510
>I'm not so familiar with software licenses so I started reading about the subject. At one point the question 'How does one profit from floss software?' popped in my head and these are some articles I came upon (quite outdated, but they still have a point).
I had similar concerns and so I did my own research on the matter. I found this one guy's 2006 blog who btfo GPL as far as I'm concerned.

http://antignu.blogspot.com/

>So my question is - does free software actually benefit the developer?
No. All of the suggested business models are pathetic and won't work long-term.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Business_models_for_open-source_software

It's as you say: you must provide support or dual license. What the FSF and OSI get wrong is that proprietary does not automatically mean closed source, and 'proprietary' is not inherently wrong. Here's a quote from Richard Stallman that shows a flaw in the design of GPL for making money.

>With free software, users don't have to pay the distribution fee in order to use the software. They can copy the program from a friend who has a copy, or with the help of a friend who has network access. Or several users can join together, split the price of one CD-ROM, then each in turn can install the software. A high CD-ROM price is not a major obstacle when the software is free.

https://www.gnu.org/philosophy/selling.html

Message too long. Click here to view full text.



Anonymous 02/20/2018 (Tue) 21:21:28 [Preview] No.12415 del
ttttttttttt>>12413
why should i pay for adobe products we have seen i.e. flash they cant code for shitttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttt


Anonymous 02/26/2018 (Mon) 12:18:57 [Preview] No.12427 del
Don't forget project orchestra.
> Play GPL vs BSD card

I'm in favor of GPL, because I find it scandalous that some companies will take free works to make money.

But seriously, don't lose your time on these kind of issue. Licencing can't be general but have to be thought case by case. That's it.
Some people might use this to make everyone lose time, and to deceive.


Anonymous 02/27/2018 (Tue) 10:34:32 [Preview] No.12432 del
(57.43 KB 654x374 itteration.jpg)
>>10510
>no money developing
Your snip is full of shit, anon.
Software "Freedom" is about assurance
as are all experiences. Everything else follows.
Nothing is stoping developers from selling their libre/floss++ warez.

Essential Property Rights:
0. Use it (Redundancy)
1. Study it (Assurance)
2. Change it (Ownership)
3. Share it (Liberty)

In this order, you can offer more and more control to the person using a product or service. The 'use' of a product or service is redundant; without 'use', there is no experience to "benefit" from. Studying how a product or service functions is essential to providing assurance that a product or service is fucntioning as advertised; without 'study', there is no knowledge, only trust. Changing or altering a product or service encourages and further establishes ownership; 'change' is the only thing that stays the same and, without it, there is only the nothing. Sharing a product or service reinforces the product or service's value through its continued usefulness; without 'share', communities would never form and civilization would die out.

Create your own licence.


Anonymous 02/27/2018 (Tue) 10:37:44 [Preview] No.12433 del
(57.43 KB 654x374 itteration.jpg)
>>10510
>no money developing
Your snip is full of shit, anon.
Software "Freedom" is about assurance
as are all experiences. Everything else follows.
Nothing is stopping developers from selling their libre/floss++ warez.

Essential Property Rights:
0. Use it (Redundancy)
1. Study it (Assurance)
2. Change it (Ownership)
3. Share it (Liberty)

In this order, you can offer more and more control to the person using a product or service. The 'use' of a product or service is redundant; without 'use', there is no experience to "benefit" from. Studying how a product or service functions is essential to providing assurance that a product or service is functioning as advertised; without 'study', there is no knowledge, only trust. Changing or altering a product or service encourages and further establishes ownership; 'change' is the only thing that stays the same and, without it, there is only the nothing. Sharing a product or service reinforces the product or service's value through its continued usefulness; without 'share', communities would never form and civilization would die out.

Create your own license.
Fixed for typos



Meltdown fix committed to OpenBSD Anonymous 02/23/2018 (Fri) 01:58:09 [Preview] No. 12419 [Reply] [Last 50 Posts]
>Meltdown mitigation is coming to OpenBSD. Philip Guenther (guenther@) has just committed a diff that implements a new mitigation technique to OpenBSD: Separation of page tables for kernel and userland. This fixes the Meltdown problems that affect most CPUs from Intel.
>When a syscall, trap, or interrupt takes a CPU from userspace to kernel the trampoline code switches page tables, switches stacks to the thread's real kernel stack, then copies over the necessary bits from the trampoline stack

Very good news. Let's see the performance impact. As undeadly contributor said, help test the snapshots from 22 february. Here (check the SHA256, please - use install62.fs for usb stick or install62.iso for CD-ROM):
https://ftp.OpenBSD.org/pub/OpenBSD/snapshots/amd64/


Anonymous 02/23/2018 (Fri) 02:22:24 [Preview] No.12420 del
>linux patches in a day
>bsd patches in a month


Anonymous 02/23/2018 (Fri) 22:54:11 [Preview] No.12421 del
>>12420
>linux does any crap diff because is employed on too many servers
>the diff reduces 50% of the performance, making servers owners waste much more money on energy
>bsd makes it simple, clean and secure. Take time, but it's did not messed too much with the kernel and is pretty verifiable for possible bugs/exploits.
>So far, no notice of performance impact, from what I know

You see, your argument is not so valid. Linux and BSD are different and users have different needs.


Anonymous 02/24/2018 (Sat) 00:53:38 [Preview] No.12422 del
>>12420
Linux had a lot more forewarning of the bugs than the BSDs so patches were already in the works.


Anonymous 02/25/2018 (Sun) 11:39:37 [Preview] No.12424 del
(359.52 KB 500x599 me.png)
>>12421
There's no performance impact because nobody fucking uses theoBSD.
>>12422
probably this



(26.35 KB 570x409 chip.png)
lowRISC: another year bites the dust? Anonymous 10/18/2017 (Wed) 05:41:40 [Preview] No. 11571 [Reply] [Last 50 Posts]
http://www.lowrisc.org/faq/

>When can I buy a lowRISC SoC?
>As with most tech projects, the most accurate answer is “When it’s ready”.
>We are expecting to crowdfund an initial instantiation of the lowRISC platform during the course of 2017.

I'm pretty sure the lowRISC FAQ said 2016 last year. It didn't happen, obviously, and it was changed to 2017, but we're running out of that, too. Ten weeks left, boys. Is a lowRISC SoC vaporware for another year?

At what point do we start looking to the J-x processors based on Hitachi's SuperH architecture? The last SH-4 patents are expiring this year.

http://j-core.org/roadmap.html
8 posts and 6 images omitted.


Anonymous 02/05/2018 (Mon) 04:21:48 [Preview] No.12347 del
>>11571
HiFive or whatever it was called released a dev board yesterday for $1000 dollars.


Anonymous 02/05/2018 (Mon) 07:59:14 [Preview] No.12350 del
>>12347
That's a dev board though, that's an investment for businesses looking to use the technology, not for enthusiasts.

I wonder, does anyone know why RISC chips always run so fucking hot? The heatsinks on the Talos machine are insane. How is it that x86 has gotten around this?


Anonymous 02/08/2018 (Thu) 22:01:56 [Preview] No.12365 del
>>12350
>why RISC chips always run so fucking hot
ARM is RISC and run really cold. I don't think that a issue is RISC. Power was constructed primarilly for servers, so it will have more cores running, more L1 cache entries, so on.
>How is it that x86 has gotten around this?
From what I know, adaptative methods. For example, the clock and voltage adapts to the need of the user.


Anonymous 02/09/2018 (Fri) 19:52:57 [Preview] No.12377 del
>>12365
That was a great reply, thank you.


Anonymous 02/20/2018 (Tue) 05:10:54 [Preview] No.12414 del
(130.38 KB 640x763 1517051241857.jpg)
>>12350
>dev board
>not for enthusiasts
it's exactly for enthusiasts, unless by enthusiasts, you mean the kind of enthusiast artist that buys Crayola instead of watercolor. HiFive is offering a modern computer, on an entirely new, unexploited platform, for us to program, all for a measly grand. The opportunity here is huge, and poorfags are gonna dismiss it just cuz it's not China cheap and includes proprietary parts.