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It was all a Communist plot Bernd 06/12/2018 (Tue) 13:13:39 [Preview] No. 17165
Anyone heard this theory?
>the Soviets made the Molotov-Ribbentrop pact to start another war between France and Germany
>the Soviets wouldn't've even joined the war, except Germany was going to lose to Poland (ending the war without weakening the Western powers)
>Operation Barbarossa was a pre-emptive strike; Hitler never had a choice to avoid war with the Soviet Union, only whether to attack or to be attacked
>the Soviets lost a shitload of personnel and materiel to Barbarossa because they had an offensive force on the border, waiting to blitz all of Europe

https://youtube.com/watch?v=IU3kyF6rQtY [Embed]


Bernd 06/12/2018 (Tue) 14:02:04 [Preview] No.17168 del
>the Soviets lost a shitload of personnel and materiel to Barbarossa

Lies. All lies.


Bernd 06/12/2018 (Tue) 15:01:31 [Preview] No.17171 del
>Operation Barbarossa was a pre-emptive strike; Hitler never had a choice to avoid war with the Soviet Union, only whether to attack or to be attacked

Partially true. Soviet government knew that war with so big and aggressive neighbor was inevitable, so they prepared military accordingly, especially after Finnish war fail. Army got new equipment and reforms, but they planned to finish them in 1942. No one knows if USSR would really attack in 42, but Hitler's strategy had some valid points.

There is a widely criticized book about planned Soviet offensive: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Icebreaker_(Suvorov)

>the Soviets lost a shitload of personnel and materiel to Barbarossa because they had an offensive force on the border, waiting to blitz all of Europe

This isn't the one reason. Although forces were concentrated near border, Soviet doctrine stated that it is ok, and our glorious Red Army can stop enemy offense and go into counterattack in any case. And Soviet forces had no proper defense lines at post-pact occupied territories, so they were stationed where they could.

There were plan to build proper defensive line but they didn't do it in time: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Molotov_Line

Another reason of losses is incompetence of officers, especially after purges, when most of trained high-level guys gone. Equipment also wasn't good, and moral and training level of average soldier was pretty bad.

Moral and training advantage of Germans existed almost to 44-45.

t. didn't watch the video because 35 min of listening is too much


Bernd 06/12/2018 (Tue) 15:07:38 [Preview] No.17172 del
Well actually Soviets were in the process of disabling their defences and moving it near the border from the previous one with Poland.


Bernd 06/14/2018 (Thu) 00:31:39 [Preview] No.17212 del
>>17165
>the Soviets made the Molotov-Ribbentrop pact to start another war between France and Germany
This is plausible in the same sense that the Western powers wanted Germany and the USSR to wage war and destroy each other, but there were a lot more factors involved. Interwar Germany and USSR had shared interests in partitioning Eastern Europe and overcoming isolation, and their cooperation dated all the way to the Weimar period (see: Lipetsk airbase).


Bernd 12/26/2018 (Wed) 19:31:42 [Preview] No.21593 del
Related with thread, there is a book called 3rd reich victorious, it tells about possible way to achieve axis victories, though not necessarily dominating one, just the ones enough to germany not to lose war in a terrible way.

The book is in more in depth than I can tell, I suggest every kc tier people should take a look, easy to find it as pdf.


Bernd 12/26/2018 (Wed) 19:33:29 [Preview] No.21594 del
let's see if it works.


Bernd 12/26/2018 (Wed) 20:28:23 [Preview] No.21598 del
How did I miss this thread?
Anyway. Gonna watch the video, actually it's on right now. Actually it's paused right now but whatever.

>>17165
Anyone heard this theory?
Yes, but reality is more complex as previous posters pointed out.

>>21593
I think the key of winning against Russia isn't in defeating her but taking the control over her. I'm not entirely sure if it's doable but Germany might had a chance doing it. They could have posed as liberators who frees the people from the oppression of evil bolsheviks. But for this they would had to give up their Lebensraum dream. Or postpone it to later date.


Bernd 12/26/2018 (Wed) 20:34:09 [Preview] No.21599 del
>>21598
>>21598
Controlling wasnt a viable option without treating USSR minorities very well, we know especially SS treated them as second class people. Which wouldn't be that much of case if the invasion handled by imperial germany instead of nazi germany.

>Anyone heard this theory?
I think I stated that allies germany's development and violation of versailles. I think they did that on purpose to weaken USSR and germany then take control of both. Such theory also exist though idk how much people agree on with that. Remember red hysteria was real during those times.


Bernd 12/26/2018 (Wed) 20:47:04 [Preview] No.21602 del
Not sure if I'll finish this video today. One tidbit at 7:17, he says that land lease didn't matter, the SU didn't need all that war material to win.

>>21599
>>Anyone heard this theory?
I wanted to quote that from OP but forgot meme arrow.


Bernd 12/26/2018 (Wed) 20:53:19 [Preview] No.21604 del
>>21602
>>21602
>I wanted to quote that from OP but forgot meme arrow.
I know, just wanted to say that anyway.


Bernd 12/26/2018 (Wed) 20:58:52 [Preview] No.21605 del
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>>21598
>They could have posed as liberators who frees the people from the oppression of evil bolsheviks. But for this they would had to give up their Lebensraum dream. Or postpone it to later date.

They actually did it, and did it like your said. Near 1 million (numbers go from 600k to 1500k) of different Soviet citizens fought on German side (it is only about soldiers, not workers). German propaganda displayed bolsheviks, communists and Jews as the enemy, but not the common Russian person.

Of course war is war, especially when it is that big, so civilians often suffered, were killed in battles or shot by Germans, but there were no full-going ethnic cleansing of every Russian or such. Some groups, like Jews, party members and commissars were executed or gone to camps, but most of common people lived as the live (although in pretty poor conditions). Some people were taken to Germany to work at factories (involuntarily of course).

For example, my grandma lived some time under German occupation in south part of Russia. She said that even schools worked, and main problem was food. Germans soldiers weren't too friendly, but did not do anything very barbarous except executing group of miners who tried to rebel. She had much more negative view about local cossacks, who openly supported Hitler and hated other Russians.

After the war propaganda gone to full demonization of Germans and Russian collaborationists. Name of Vlasov (leader of Russian Liberation Army) became taboo even in historical documents, and even today this part of story is very negatively viewed by public.

For Germans - they didn't try to push their autistic ideas at start of war much (I guess they waited for victory to implement Lebensraum), and stopped everything when they saw that war is going bad. So, they even started to invent all these imaginary "Gothic-Crimean connection" and other things to recruit locals into army. That didn't help them though.


Bernd 12/26/2018 (Wed) 21:11:16 [Preview] No.21608 del
>>21605
As far as I know minorities quickly dissapointed with german treatment hence the all partisan act against german army.
I dont say they were as bad as fully blown stalinists.

>but there were no full-going ethnic cleansing of every Russian or such
would be extremely stupid thing to do, atleast in middle of war.


Bernd 12/26/2018 (Wed) 21:39:02 [Preview] No.21610 del
>>21599
>Controlling wasnt a viable option without treating USSR minorities very well

They mostly were treated well (except Belorussians who suffered much), considering "well" in war situation of course. Soviet minorities were overrepresented in collaborationist army. Although it was not ideological thing but practical - many minorities were anti-soviet and had own nationalist sentiment, so they were great tools against USSR, and often voluntarily acted against Soviet forces without German support.

For example, few Caucasian nations were deported because they openly supported Germans and were very bad as soldiers for Soviets. There were mass deportations, almost everyone was taken into train in few days and moved to Kazakhstan or Siberia. Stalin was Caucasian himself and knew how to work with them.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deportation_of_the_Chechens_and_Ingush

I heard stories from Kazakhs and Russians who lived in 50-60s in Kazakhstan (until Caucasians returned back) and they weren't happy about their new neighbors though.

People often don't understand that war and conditions on eastern front were much more harsh than in other places, so levels of good or bad treatment couldn't be compared to, for example, France or South Europe, where Germans were much more friendly to everyone.


Bernd 12/26/2018 (Wed) 21:52:35 [Preview] No.21612 del
>>21605
There's doing it and doing it. Huge difference. In case of the events in WWII the doing is very half-assed and feels more like a coincidental thing, they went with the grain. There were some men to pick up so they played on their anti-soviet feelings. It also feels that it was just a propaganda. What I read that mostly Ukros and other "minorities" sided with the Germans.
On the other hand there were lively partizan activity behind the German lines. Ofc a part of those partizans were originally soldiers (I dunno ratio) for example from destroyed units who for some reason didn't fell into captivity, and many leading figures were NKVD officers. If there were proper attempts to win people the operation of these partizan units would have been impossible as guerillas can only be successful if they enjoy the support of the locals. And they did. This means the Germans didn't.


Bernd 12/26/2018 (Wed) 22:12:50 [Preview] No.21617 del
>>21610
>France or South Europe, where Germans were much more friendly to everyone.
In case of Denmark and Norway the soldiers got instructions in the combat order not sure the exact idiom, maybe it's routine order, in Hungarian we call it "order of the day" or "daily order" how to treat the civilian populace. I think they had similar in case of France but not the SU.


Bernd 12/26/2018 (Wed) 22:32:12 [Preview] No.21620 del
>>21612
>In case of the events in WWII the doing is very half-assed and feels more like a coincidental thing, they went with the grain.

Yes. Eastern campaign was shitty planned by Germans, they relied on initial rush and were euphoric about easy European conquest. Big and old enemy - France - gone to nowhere in year, who else could stop glorious Aryan people? So, Germans really thought that it will be relatively easy thing, and no one expected what happened next.

>What I read that mostly Ukros and other "minorities" sided with the Germans.

It is pretty complex question.

First - most of "minorities" (considering Ukrainians as minority is pretty wide speculation though) had some nationalist anti-soviet forces already. Such forces in Russian mainland were nonexistent, because half of them emigrated in civil war, and others were crushed in 20s (Tukhachevsky even used chemical weapons against Tambov peasants). National republics, especially far from center, were less controlled and had serious anti-Soviet and anti-Russian sentiment. "New lands" like Western Ukraine or Baltic, even had armed resistance, so it is obvious that these people would be overrepresented at German side.

Second - USSR ordered mobilization early, and most young people who can fight already were in Soviet army. Military propaganda did a good thing and they wouldn't want to support Germany in the war (except for people like Chechens as I wrote before). Many people and industries were evacuated to Siberia (many known modern industry companies like Uralvagonzavod started as this).

Third - post-war historiography on USSR side openly talked about evil nazi-collaborators from minorities, but was almost silent about RLA and Russian forces, it was a taboo (and often remains today). There is even no official count of these people. One source (from wiki) says that biggest part of pro-German armed forces (400k people) were Russians, next (250k) were Ukrainians, other groups were smaller. It still pretty shady thing because being member of pro-German forces was criminal offence, people were jailed and sometimes executed long after war for this. No one from these people want to say about war past.

Main problem was bad planning from German side and shortage of time. Most of territories were occupied for maximum 1-1.5 years, and Germans had nor time nor resources to build proper system for military recruiting in situation when heavy warfare happens in few hundreds kilometers away.

Although all that war was an error for Germans.

>On the other hand there were lively partizan activity behind the German lines.

Partisan effectiveness was overestimated. They surely did problems for German forces, but they weren't real threat. Considering that almost 70 millions of people lived on occupied territories, that activity was very small. Even Russian wiki says that in 41-42 partisans didn't do real harm to German supplies. In 43 and later Germany already lost, so it doesn't matter.

>If there were proper attempts to win people the operation of these partizan units would have been impossible as guerillas can only be successful if they enjoy the support of the locals. And they did. This means the Germans didn't.

But they tried, although failed. Considering time constraints and resistance from USSR, Germany didn't had a chance. Especially when they couldn't take Moscow or Leningrad to demoralize pro-Soviet forces.


Bernd 12/26/2018 (Wed) 22:37:47 [Preview] No.21621 del
>>21620
>>21620
>Yes. Eastern campaign was shitty planned by Germans, they relied on initial rush and were euphoric about easy European conquest.
imagine being so retarded, trying to invade russia during summer.

If only hitler paid attention to geography class during his highschool times.


Bernd 12/26/2018 (Wed) 22:45:48 [Preview] No.21623 del
>21620
Will probably reflect that. Not today, next is sleep goddamit this is the second post I have to delet coz I clicked reply by accident, I'm exhausted. But:
>>17171
>There is a widely criticized book about planned Soviet offensive: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Icebreaker_(Suvorov)
The dude in video highly builds on that book. You really should watch. Breddy indresding.


Bernd 12/26/2018 (Wed) 23:03:07 [Preview] No.21624 del
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>>21623
>on that book

I even have one, although I've only read part of it.

I'll watch later I guess.


Bernd 12/26/2018 (Wed) 23:16:07 [Preview] No.21625 del
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>>21620
Russia was actually in a pretty bad state before the war internally. The most common argument is that the T34 outclassed the Panzer IV, but it wasn't being produced enough before 1943, they practically got boosted to full strength by the American and British lend-lease.
How Germany could've won the war in the east:
>smash the British at Dunkirk, making opinion of war in England much more negative
>Churchill doesn't come into power and keep fighting the Germans, thus they accept the peace offers with both Germany and Italy
>this means no lend-lease from Britain + more allocation to the east
>they don't have to invade Yugoslavia to get to Greece, nor invade Egypt as that was a British problem
>this means Barbarossa begins in May, and things go as well as the start, but soldiers are prepared with winter equipment
>Japan attacks the USSR from the east, forcing troops from the Siberian front to stay and fight the Japanese, meaning the Germans don't get pushed back west initially
>as Britain is out of the war, America cannot partake in a strategic invasion of Europe, even if Hitler declares war on them (which was for unprovoked attacks on German assets and lend-lease to the USSR, it only made the war official)
>with more troops allocated, Leningrad becomes much-more one-sided, and if a better German contingent + the Finns attack them at the same time, it could fall)
>Hohols, Cossacks, Tatars, and Caucasians all see this as a victory for the Axis, meaning that they would still join, possibly in much larger numbers than before
>Hitler still reroutes the 4th Panzer army early to take the oil fields in the Caucasus, the Germans would be able to take on the Soviets in Stalingrad much better
>with the Caucasus subdued, and most key-cities in the west taken, Moscow would be up for the taking, and at this point, the Red Army would collapse just like the whites in the Russian Civil War


Bernd 12/27/2018 (Thu) 05:49:25 [Preview] No.21626 del
>>17165
>Germany was going to lose to Poland
wat


Bernd 12/27/2018 (Thu) 06:15:24 [Preview] No.21627 del
>>21626
I'm pretty sure OP meant lose Poland to the Soviets, which was partitioned between a German west and a Soviet east.


Bernd 12/27/2018 (Thu) 07:51:01 [Preview] No.21628 del
>>21627
No. Guy in video states that.


Bernd 12/27/2018 (Thu) 08:14:13 [Preview] No.21630 del
>>21628
Seems like he's just a total assburger then.


Bernd 12/27/2018 (Thu) 08:59:19 [Preview] No.21631 del
>>21630
Not necessarily. It might be a good idea to look into the problem a little closer. Now I think I'll play the devil's advocate and try to argue in favor of what he says. This will take several post, not even sure if I'll finish it.
The first thing maybe to question is the importance of Poland for the Soviet. For this we should try and see the Soviet intention and motivation.
Originally at the bolshevik takeover the idea of exporting communism and creating the World Revolution was an ideal they wished to reach, this is an idealistic approach we could put it in another way: they wanted to take control not just in Russia but the other parts of the world. During the history of communism, they managed this partially both in direct and indirect ways, at the end WWII they basically conquered half of Europe, and during the Cold War quite a few places "converted" to communism/socialism all over the world. Both can be considered as the "export of communism".
But right after the bolshevik takeover the export proved to be an impossible thing, all the other places the communist revolution failed. In the Hungary it went for a while but because they didn't get support from Russia, in the end it failed here too. Does this mean they forgot about it? I don't think so, simply froze the plan for a while and started play a long game.
Than Stalin came to power, who might not seem to be an exemplar communist, much greater egoism. But this isn't going against the original idea simply it means a more practical imperialist approach (instead of idealistic "export communism") which uses the idea of world revolution to make others bow to his power. He still played for the whole world.
So Poland herself wasn't that important, they wanted Europe.


cont. Bernd 12/27/2018 (Thu) 09:22:18 [Preview] No.21632 del
>>21631
But for this, they needed France and Britain to attack Germany.
First the Soviet baited with the Spanish Civil War, but F n B signed a Non-Intervention Agreement and they kept to it. Poland was a much suitable bait, because F n B guaranteed her safety and promised they attack Germany if she attacks first.
So the Soviet baited Germany into attacking Poland, with he Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact and it's implication that they will assist in the conquest of Poland. The Germans counted on them to attack Poland, they planned on it. The Germans also planned the invasion on the premise that France and Britain will attack them, they had to keep forces and war material/supplies in the back, especially that they thought after they defeated Poland together with the Soviet, they have to move forces back to west to fend off F n B and turn the defense there into an offense and defeat them too. Only after they saw that F n B isn't actively attacking on the west they turned to north first and made sure they will control Denmark and Norway. Therefore they only had just so much troops and supplies to keep up for a short time.
But the Soviet didn't attack, but waited. Waited for France and Britain actually doing something. But they didn't so they said, eh fuck it and finally invaded (after they secured an agreement with Japan) but by then the German troops there were exhausted.
This exhaustion should be examined, not an impossible idea, but were they really?

Huh, this took only one more post.


Bernd 12/27/2018 (Thu) 09:56:40 [Preview] No.21633 del
>>21632
One thing I forgot.
The dude says in the video that the German wartime production was at very low speed at that time, it was far from it's full capacity.


Bernd 12/27/2018 (Thu) 11:52:04 [Preview] No.21638 del
>>21621
When else can you invade, Timur the Lame? At Spring and Autumn you have rasputitsa, that is swampy mud all over everywhere, and at Winter you have Le Russian Winter. Scandinavia is warmer than Belarus, the more to the east you go the worse it gets.
And that's the warmest path in, in the east there is the literal North Cold Pole, that is a place colder than The North Pole for a change.
Both Nappy and Hitler planned to winter at Moscow, except the first one had Moscow burned by the locals and the second one fell short. There is no other way to invade Russia on foot. And then even if Hitler succeeded, Moscow street fighting would have been StalingradX10, and the govt would chill at Samara same way it chilled at St.Pete's 130 years before.

>>21625
>Japan attacks the USSR from the east, forcing troops from the Siberian front to stay and fight the Japanese, meaning the Germans don't get pushed back west initially
They tried twice beforehand, at Primorie and Mongolia, and both times had their asses handed to them. Japs are terrible at land warfare. Perhaps the IJN is cool, the Imperial Army was shit.
They had big plans for the Russian Far East during the total collapse of 1917-1921 already, yet withdrew because their soldiers suffered unacceptable losses due to cold of all things (+America getting upset too). Occupation of Russian Far East would be a terrible drain, not possible, not with an already full-swing campaing in China.
>Moscow would be up for the taking
Nappy took Moscow, didn't change anything. Again, Russia doesn't end at Moscow. There are tens of millions of people on the Volga, Kazan oil fields were already being exploited and Samara prepped to be temporary capital. If the worst comes to pass, there are Ekaterinburg, Chelyabinsk and Omsk east of the Urals. Russia is impossible to occupy, it's a fact.
Maaaybe Hitler could have created some client Russia state to fight its Soviet twin on its own weight, most probably never would.

Anyway, the war was lost before it even began. Maaaaybe smashing the British at Dunkirk might have changed something, but most probably not.




There's a more interesting theory for you to ruminate. The WWII actually prolonged communism for 40 years more that it should have lived on its own. Stalin's industrialization was a total disaster in terms of cost/benefit, like anything communist, and Soviet science was dead in the water, because it seems scientists don't like to be slaves in gulags with families taken hostage (I'm looking at you, Korolev). Those that weren't already purger on made-up charges or blissfully emigrated and produced nice things in the US like Sikorsky.
Anyway, Stalin's USSR was that close to total civilization failure, it couldn't reproduce modern technology and with villagers enslaved in the kolkhoz was destined for famine. So instead of dissoluting before full famine strikes, like in late 80's, it would disintegrate for the same reason in late 40's. That's the reason for planned conquest of Europe, it would be the USSR till Lisbon in 48 or so, or no USSR at all by 48.

Then the WWII happened and the USSR got so much bennies with Land Lease to keep it afloat, and then took whatever industry it wanted from the Eastern Europe, having said Eastern Europe chained for further exploitation. So it subsisted on whatever industry and science it could get from the Reich's leftover, which allowed it make it two decades more till the oil price boom and survive on it for another couple decades.
By the 80's the oil price fell + stolen 40's industrial tech was waaay outdated = collapse, famine averted thanks to international aid. Except it happened 40 years later than it should have had.


Bernd 12/27/2018 (Thu) 12:11:06 [Preview] No.21639 del
>>21638
>>21638
>When else can you invade, Timur the Lame? At Spring and Autumn you have rasputitsa, that is swampy mud all over everywhere, and at Winter you have Le Russian Winter
In winter just like the türco-mongols. Where the enemy can't dig trenches in rock hard ground, terrarian is relatively flat, you are not dependent on bridges as rivers are frozen, not to mention russia is not urbanized and they were dependent on non urban frontlines more than western front.

It's a basic geography knowledge. Also napoleons army had great diseases. It's not my problem if you don't know why when to not invade russia and cant analyze why napoleon failed.

>And then even if Hitler succeeded, Moscow street fighting would have been StalingradX10
considering the fact many sovoks forced to fight, I doubt highly, I doubt even more highly if the SS wasnt mistreated locals, encouraged by their ideology.

Also not losing the air fight agains britain because of retarded Göring would help brilliantly.

Pretty much your entire ergument depends on x take moscow therebefore axis taking moscow would provide same outcome. This is a determinstic thinking of you as you lack proper knowledge to analyze why they failed in the first place.


Bernd 12/27/2018 (Thu) 12:17:16 [Preview] No.21640 del
>>21638
>>21638
>Both Nappy and Hitler planned to winter at Moscow
both of heir invasion started in summer.


Bernd 12/27/2018 (Thu) 13:00:16 [Preview] No.21641 del
>>21638
>There's a more interesting theory for you to ruminate
We really should tackle the first one on the plate. There are several statements in the video to examine.

>>21639
>In winter just like the türco-mongols.
There's truth in it. Not winter itself was the problem for the Germans at the end of '41 but that they didn't have proper equipment. However if we assume that Stalin would have attack soon (like the dude says in the vid, and not years later) than Germans didn't have time to wait for winter they had to utilize summer.


Bernd 12/27/2018 (Thu) 13:07:42 [Preview] No.21643 del
>>21641
>>21641
But just for sake of rushing sending your soldiers without proper winter equipment and a doctrine heavily relies on non-winter warfare is grave mistake as we seen.

>However if we assume that Stalin would have attack soon
Soldiers on german border were very disorganized. Plus soviets during that time (correct me if I'm wrong about this) still didn't know japanese wouldnt attack unless germans take moscow, so there is no huge amount of soldier redeployment as we expect from possible mass assault. So yeah, soviets were also cautious and stalin was aware of huge proper officer gap due to infamous purges.


Bernd 12/27/2018 (Thu) 13:11:34 [Preview] No.21644 del
>>21643
>>21641
Also operation barbarossa started after german air force depleted, so germans wouldnt benefit from good weather as they lack air superiority. Airforce do better job when the weather is better, in this case summer, so germans also let soviet airforce do its job better by starting the invasion during summer.


Bernd 12/27/2018 (Thu) 13:59:42 [Preview] No.21647 del
>>21639
>In winter just like the türco-mongols
The Mongol-Tatars attacked on horse 750 years ago. From the east. Onto a long disintegrated dozen of kingdoms, not some ubercentralized empire.
Not relevant.
Like, I get it that the horse cavalry doesn't care about mud or snow. Have fun horse charging tanks and artillery forts. Horse carriages had the same eternal problem with rasputitsa and snow to get any artillery with themselves.

The Mongols could allow themselves take only their bows and arrows and tents, you can't fight the XX century war with just handguns and lances. Already 250 years after the Mongol invasion all the khanates were conquered by Cossacks with firearms with little effort, things change.

The closest analogue would be air raiding, but German air force was already weakened by losing the Battle of Britain.

>considering the fact many sovoks forced to fight, I doubt highly
So, Stalingrad x10. Or do you presume the USSR changed its policies that much before Stalingrad? It didn't.

Anyway, you presume to have some higher yet 'basic geography knowledge' knowledge both French and German generals lacked while most likely not being even an army officer. Poor stupid generals, aye. I suggest you reconsider your uppity approach to operations planned by peoples who were actually in the army actually conquering shit successfully.

It they chose to attack the USSR that time, it means there already was no better time. Waiting till 42 would have Germany and rest of Europe raped harder that Izmail at 1790.


Bernd 12/27/2018 (Thu) 14:17:23 [Preview] No.21648 del
>>21647
>>21647
>Not relevant.
It is, since forests of north were big issue for typical steppe army and I dont remember them dying by shitting their pants.

It's also relevant, since the army was highly mobile, not infantry core slow army, german army was highly motorised and mobile but unfit for winter war doctrine.

I get that russia wasnt strong as much as soviets, but nazi army shot its foot before soviet russia pulled the trigger. And I don't say mongols win therebefore germans would automatically win, I'm just stating the facts that analyze from the situation, so solely declaring war during winter is not equal to flat out dominating victory for germans.

>So, Stalingrad x10
stalingard is not soviet's communication and transportation center. Japans didn't state they would join the war if stalingrad has fallen. Stalingrad does not have soviet central electrical power grid. Stalingrad didn't have hoarded grain (though they would most likely burn it out of desperation)

Also taking the communication means you cannot force many other sovoks to fight for USSR meanwhile taking stalingrad does not really offer such benefit. Also focusing on moscow means no need to seperate the eastern army into 3.

>knowledge both French and German generals lacked
I highly doubt old prussian elite didn't know this, in fact I don't doubt I'm really sure half of generalstaff refuse it. As for french, I have to remind you during revolution lots of invaluable frenchmen which includes officers tasted the cold steel.

So yeah, healthy amount of elitism helps your army to not fuck up massively.


Bernd 12/27/2018 (Thu) 14:54:50 [Preview] No.21649 del
>>21647
He clearly stated why was a good idea to attack in winter here: >>21639
He didn't say it's great because the Mongols did that but because:
>Where the enemy can't dig trenches in rock hard ground, terrarian is relatively flat, you are not dependent on bridges as rivers are frozen
Hence the Mongol chose winter, hence the Germans should have done that too because regardless the military tech, they could have benefited of it.

>>21643
>Soldiers on german border were very disorganized.
Nod really. The units prepared for an offensive campaign and not to be attacked. - Well if we assume Suvorov and the dude in the video is right.

>>21644
>german air force depleted
>lack air superiority.
Didn't really mattered - again as playing the devil's advocate - the Russian planes consisted mostly close air support ones as typically fit for the offense, they also were deployed very close to the front on bases that fell quickly victim of the German Blitz.
This is also worthy to check. I mean the composition of Russian air forces, was it really how the dude says.


Bernd 12/27/2018 (Thu) 15:15:47 [Preview] No.21651 del
>>21649
>>21649
>. The units prepared for an offensive campaign and not to be attacked
No, I would claim true word is prepearing and I would bet it would be during 1942. Everyday germany was losing due to exposure from the air which hindered their industrial capacity in long run.

>Didn't really mattered - again as playing the devil's advocate
It mattered in long run because, germans lost their gambit in the sea around 1941-1942 against britain. So lacking air superiority means you should expect a naval landing, of course allies were cautious still. But we can easily say if allies didnt gain the air superiority there wouldnt be naval invasion or naval blockade which eases the german troops on the east greatly.

I dont completely disregard what suvorov says, but I would claim the documents do not exactly point out 1941 or earlier rush as soviet mobilisation was still continuing, officer gap was still a thing and ideal strategy would let britain and germany weaking each other assuming stalin was really evil genius even if not I think there would be some (how many I have no idea, but easy to assume they were not overly confident) red army officers support such approach.

>He clearly stated why was a good idea to attack in winter here
Also because russians liked to take initiative during winter for the reasons I stated, so the idea wasnt really so absurd.

This pic is from a time where germans still have upperhand on land. Though it's okay to some of you being cynical about pic as it's from w*kipedia. You can still check operation uranus.

t.britannica mustard race


Bernd 12/27/2018 (Thu) 19:02:54 [Preview] No.21670 del
>>21651
>Everyday germany was losing due to exposure from the air which hindered their industrial capacity in long run.
Germany's production grew continuously until the factories were captured, Allied bombing did little.
The SU was mobilizing for two years by then (summer of '41) they had numerical superiority on the German border. And as you said the mobilization was ongoing they could send continuously fresh troops to west after their campaign started.
>if allies didnt gain the air superiority there wouldnt be naval invasion
True. They absolutely needed air cover for that. But that came later in the war.
>officer gap was still a thing
Woudln't matter the new officers risen to their ranks just would have to learn their trade during real action which they did anyway, only during on the defence. Their fuckups wouldn't matter as they could have cover the losses laughingly both in material and manpower. They wouldn't even lost all those troops they did after the German invasion started.

>assuming stalin was really evil genius
I think generally we really underestimate both Hitler and Stalin. The first one obviously because of the failure and defeat, the second one we usually just don't pay enough mind, we shrug: he was an evil psycho dictator.
Being a genius doesn't guarantee success or leading role in anything. To rise in power that takes ambition and ego which frequently don't paired with intelligence - as we experience in our own governments on many occasion.
But sometimes it does pair and one rise who can play anyone like a harp. A little scary to think of it because this actually implies that there are secret conspiracies and they could do whatever with us and we cannot do a thing about it.
Stalin may have that evil genius. Some might say that if he was such a genius why things weren't better in the SU? Well, maybe he was genius because he knew people are generally shits and whatever they touch will turn into turd and he calculated failure into his masterplan as well. He didn't care because he didn't have compassion, he only cared about gaining more power, and maybe cared about this game as he maybe thought about it as such.
Hmm. I'm starting to get carried away, also sleepiness is creeping on me.


Bernd 12/27/2018 (Thu) 19:21:42 [Preview] No.21671 del
>>21670
>>21670
>Germany's production grew continuously until the factories were captured
where can I check third reich's industrial capacity after failure in britain?

I also said on long run, not literally just before barbarossa started.

>But that came later in the war.
True but let's be honest here, allies can't make naval invasion and soviet counterattack is sucessful even though they get more loses than they supposed to be due to lack of allies divertion.

How would the allies react? Do you think they would just let soviets swallow entire continental europe? This is the part it gets interesting as allies not being able to launch naval invasion and soviets possibly winning and rushing towards berlin would give axis some interesting but also kinda unpredictable diplomatic options. I can't tell you or anyone enough how much air superiority mattered.

>Woudln't matter the new officers risen to their ranks just would have to learn their trade during real action which they did anyway, only during on the defence
And it costed them high amount of manpower. I'm just trying to say it's not a good way to prepeare an invasion, of course they could just ignore it due to their overconfidence about manpower and stuff.

>I think generally we really underestimate both Hitler and Stalin
atleast on chins, gitler is not underestimated, in fact overestimated in military sense. he was an uneducated corporal, the only one of the good things he done for the army is mechanising it but even that does not come from geniusness or any kind of tactician skill. He really liked the idea due to his experiences from ww1 where trench warfare often lead to stalemate and hitler really hated that, rightfully so. But it was an emotional decision, just like his lust for "wünderwaffe"

I see him as manipulating genius that certainly had social skills but failure about in military, science and culture. Prussian elite was more than capable of winning the war also if not for nazi regime jews would stay in germany which many were served during ww1, which means good amount of scientists wouldnt have to escape, which is quite often underestimated, as having proper scientific and academic tradition takes centuries.

>. I'm starting to get carried away, also sleepiness is creeping on me.
It's only 10.20 PM macaristan.


Bernd 12/27/2018 (Thu) 19:37:56 [Preview] No.21672 del
>>21638
>They tried twice beforehand, at Primorie and Mongolia, and both times had their asses handed to them. Japs are terrible at land warfare. Perhaps the IJN is cool, the Imperial Army was shit.
The Japanese would still be able to force the Siberian troops to the east, thus not letting the Germans get pushed back west initially, which would be the objective here.
>Nappy took Moscow, didn't change anything. Again, Russia doesn't end at Moscow. There are tens of millions of people on the Volga, Kazan oil fields were already being exploited and Samara prepped to be temporary capital. If the worst comes to pass, there are Ekaterinburg, Chelyabinsk and Omsk east of the Urals. Russia is impossible to occupy, it's a fact.
Napoleon's invasion of Russia lasted literally only around 5 months, and was forced out after the winter, something that Hitler's troops survived even without proper winter clothing.
And again, as I said, the USSR was doing very bad internally, it was industrialising, but it wasn't producing enough stuff (while Germany was), and was living off lend-lease until 1943. Without the British lend-lease and with more German allocation (as well as no bombing on Germany), the Wehrmacht would prove a much better match against the Red Army, especially the first couple of years.
What I'm saying here is that they could possibly have the Red Army collapse just like what happened to the Whites after WWI.


Bernd 12/27/2018 (Thu) 19:41:18 [Preview] No.21673 del
>>21638
Basically have what happened in this video here, but plus Finland, Italy, and the Tripartite Pact aid:
https://youtube.com/watch?v=EnQ_3anpWQk [Embed]
I don't completely agree with it, but it offers a good idea on how Germany would've done against the USSR without the British or possibly Americans.


Bernd 12/27/2018 (Thu) 21:38:19 [Preview] No.21682 del
>>21671
>It's only 10.20 PM macaristan.
It was 8 PM. But nowadays I stay awake late but I always get up early mostly in the same time, I got used to it. I'm sleeping like 6 hours per day for weeks now. All right I'm off.


Bernd 12/27/2018 (Thu) 22:24:55 [Preview] No.21683 del
>>21638
>And that's the warmest path in, in the east there is the literal North Cold Pole, that is a place colder than The North Pole for a change.
>Again, Russia doesn't end at Moscow. There are tens of millions of people on the Volga, Kazan oil fields were already being exploited and Samara prepped to be temporary capital. If the worst comes to pass, there are Ekaterinburg, Chelyabinsk and Omsk east of the Urals. Russia is impossible to occupy,

You don't need to occupy country fully to win the war, you need only do that level of damage so country would stop active fighting. Russia is pretty much empty east of Urals, end was even emptier in 1941 than today. Conquering biggest industrial and agriculture regions and main cities could force USSR to stop the war, at least to stop the active phase of war when army can do serious offensive operations. Especially in 1941, when industry wasn't moved east properly.

That was the Hitler's plan and it wasn't too stupid, but he failed. If blitzkrieg part was relatively successful at start, control part was failed completely, although in winter of 1941 and even in 1942 USSR also was on the edge.

Comparison with Napoleon isn't direct, it was different time and different technology level.

>Japan

Japanese were just cowards with delusion of grandeur, they wanted Pacific and conflict with USA, and weren't good ally to Germany at all. But striking in the worst time for USSR (like in 1941-1942) could change the course of war, even if it wasn't easy fight. Even losing to USSR in land war in 41 could give enough pressure to USSR to allow Germany to stay for more.

>So instead of dissoluting before full famine strikes, like in late 80's

It wasn't dissolved because food or anything related to general population. Every political change in Russia/USSR history was change from the top, not from the bottom. 1917 was liberal revolution of higher classes at start, 1989 was reformatting of union by elites (union didn't really died, and almost same commie ruling class still in power). So, Stalin's USSR could be in stasis state for years. Just look at modern Central Asian states for example, they have nothing but still exist.

Maybe it would be some kind of second world country, but not collapsing failed state.


Bernd 12/28/2018 (Fri) 00:04:05 [Preview] No.21687 del
>>21683
>>21683
>Japanese were just cowards
how so?

> Even losing to USSR in land war in 41 could give enough pressure to USSR to allow Germany to stay for more.
Even if germans win, japanese would gain too little in peace table compared to germans. Risk is too big and gain is too little.

Not to mention japanese army more fittingly designed to island hopping and controlling the coasts.

>terrible ally
They took britains south asian colonies they took hongkong, with lower materails they achieved more. Meanwhile hitler couldnt even defeat some airforce in malta and gibraltar let alone take them.

If denying allies from resource rich southeast asia doesnt help I dont know what helps them. Japan not joining axis, signing non agression treaty with USSR and focusing on allies seems better option for them. Japan still wouldnt able to beat USA especially with a move like pearl harbor but atleast they could force USA to have sensible peace treaty where japan retreats from southeast asia and china but have small citybase like hongkong along with manchuria assuming murricans dont use nuke of course.


Bernd 12/28/2018 (Fri) 01:12:52 [Preview] No.21690 del
>>21672
>>21625
>The Japanese would still be able to force the Siberian troops to the east, thus not letting the Germans get pushed back west initially, which would be the objective here.
Probably true, but the question of wheter or not they would precludes that of wheter or not they could. Japan wouldn't attack the USSR, not just because of their past defeats in border skirmishes but also because of the cost/benefit ratios of their two options (attacking USSR or attacking the West), as mentioned in >>21687.
Attacking the USSR would require a commitment to face a superior enemy on difficult terrain, with victory exclusively possible if an ally on the other side of the world succeeds, with little reward other than Vladivostok -north Asia is resource-rich but the resources are all dispersed, and as Japan couldn't count on more than limited territorial gains this means few resources could be conquered. In short: a lengthy, risky and difficult campaign for little gain.
Attacking the West allowed Japan to employ the best of its military strength against a poorly defended flank of European colonial empires, with plenty of juicy resources up for grabs. For a resource-starved Japan with an idle Navy, this was the obvious choice.
And don't forget the political struggle between Army and Navy. The Army had already gotten Japan bogged down in China and now the Navy wanted its turn.

>thus they accept the peace offers with both Germany and Italy
Getting Britain out of the war would be even bigger than that. The Acchiles Heel of Germany's economy in both World Wars was the crippling naval blockade cutting off its access to key imported raw materials, and global trade in general. Lift the blockade and Gitler gets a monumental economic boost.
But it's also easier said than done. There were military reasons for the failure to annihilate the Britons in Dunkirk, so an all-out attempt to destroy the retreating defeat could be harmful to the remainder of the French campaign or just fail. And even success at Dunkirk wouldn't guarantee a British exit from the war; Hitler repeatedly underestimated Britain's will to wage war and take it to its very last consequences.


Bernd 12/28/2018 (Fri) 02:17:29 [Preview] No.21692 del
>>21690
>Getting Britain out of the war would be even bigger than that.
Not really. Even in our timeline, Britain was close to accepting the peace offers. The Earl of Halifax who refused the position of PM wanted to make peace with Germany for example. If they actually saw the Britons get annihilated at Dunkirk, it's very likely they would want to make peace with Germany.
Much of Britain's will to wage war was a Churchill thing, just to let you know.


Bernd 12/28/2018 (Fri) 06:54:03 [Preview] No.21696 del
>>21687
>how so?

Because main reason that they didn't attack was their defeat from Soviet army in limited conflicts of 1939. Placement of their forces didn't allow USSR to withdraw army from Far East, but attack, even not successful as blitzkrieg, could do much better effect in worst (for USSR) years of war.

>Even if germans win, japanese would gain too little in peace table compared to germans. Risk is too big and gain is too little.

And if Germans lose, Japan also lose much. Sometimes you need to do something risky and unsuccessful to win in big picture. USSR army also wasn't really so powerful and strong until late part of war, and Japanese forces aren't that bad.

Maybe with success at Far East and Europe with combined actions of Germany and Japan would stop USA from joining the war (especially without Pearl Harbor), giving time for Axis to consolidate more forces and pacify occupied lands.

Although all these alternative theories are very weak, because sometimes even small differences may change history much.


Bernd 12/28/2018 (Fri) 07:47:02 [Preview] No.21697 del
>>21696
>USSR army also wasn't really so powerful and strong until late part of war
Powerful is relative. Later Red Army was powerful compared to early Red Army, but early Red Army was very powerful compared to other countries' militaries. It's failure at the start of Barbarossa - I'd like to follow the original track of the thread - wasn't because it was weak, had shitty tanks, inexperienced officer corps or any other usual excuses the post-war propaganda/history writing came up with but because they planned for offense, they prepared for offense, they were deployed for offense, they were equipped for offense, they didn't made any preparation for defense.
In relation to this, the argument that after they invaded Poland they left their entrenched positions and they didn't have any in their new area of deployment is kinda true but since then 1.5-2 years passed, that should have been enough to build new ones in Poland if they prepared to keep those borders and they had no plans to move further west. If they had plans on push more toward west but not in the immediate future (as in the summer of '41) but years later, it would have been also sensible to create fortifications in case of a German confrontation. So yes, they didn't have entrenchments, but they didn't have it because they considered their positions very temporary.


Bernd 12/28/2018 (Fri) 11:53:37 [Preview] No.21700 del
>>21696
>>21696
>And if Germans lose, Japan also lose much
not if they didn't join to axis.

As you said there too many things to consider, I would imagine soviets would want a peace treaty if japan was sucessful against soviets because I doubt they would risk moscow for vladistovok which would also make japan-german relations worse.

I also make lots of typos like Türks in youtube comment section, fug.


Bernd 12/28/2018 (Fri) 15:18:43 [Preview] No.21702 del
(75.95 KB 640x480 annoyed_kid.jpg)
>>21700
Let me tell you about typos...


Bernd 12/29/2018 (Sat) 19:45:21 [Preview] No.21732 del
So started reading Suvorov's Icebreaker. Or moar liek pecking it for information morsel. And ofc I started it in sensible order, from the back. Meanwhile tho looked into other stuff like that tank encyclopedia Turkish Bernd posted. But then I noticed a video among the recommended ones:
https://youtube.com/watch?v=UxQE05OaOBc [Embed]
I prefer those military historians who has already grown pubes.
Back to the book:
The few lines I read feels very lopsided. Previously I mentioned it's customary to think Hitler and Stalin weren't geniuses for reasons. The author change that. Now only Hitler and his men aren't considered geniuses. I'll go further the book set them as retards. Here's an quote (at a picture):
"Joachim von Ribbentrop signs the pact dividing up Poland. He did not know Great Britain and France would declare war on Germany in response. Stalin did."
See?


Bernd 12/29/2018 (Sat) 20:22:44 [Preview] No.21736 del
>>21732
>>21732
>He did not know Great Britain and France would declare war on Germany in response
Hitler was trying his best to start a war, he didn't really care much about chamberlain's appeasement policy, if they didn't decalre war, hitler would invade another country again anyway.

The foolish ones in this case are france and britain (read chamberlain) Because France not wanting another war and trusting maginot line too much cause them to not pursue a bloody war when germany invaded poland, brits didn't want to be the ones only getting their hand dirty while nobody is doing anything.

It's very predictable that, western powers who wanted to carry on the status quo would be very mad when two rising radical powers dealing with each other(molotof-ribbentrop pact) Invasion of poland just gave them legit excuse to declaration of war.


Bernd 12/30/2018 (Sun) 19:33:49 [Preview] No.21765 del
>>21736
For that quote: I think F n B even warned Germany, that they will attack them in return of attacking Poland.
>Hitler was trying his best to start a war,
He really did. Personally I don't think he needed to be baited for that. Also the war with the Soviet Union was inevitable, for at least two(three) reasons.
1. ideological:
1/A. Communism had to be eradicated.
1/B. Lebensraum
2. Economical: they needed resources for the industry and had to break the insulation that prevented to get these. Hitler didn't build a colonial empire but a continental.


Bernd 12/31/2018 (Mon) 03:31:25 [Preview] No.21771 del
>>21765
https://lebensraumyth.blogspot.com/
And Hitler would've restored the colonial empire in some way regardless.


Bernd 12/31/2018 (Mon) 04:39:37 [Preview] No.21774 del
>>21771
Soviets didn't violate any agreement with Germany by annexing Lithuania. Molotov and Ribbentrop adjusted the agreed-upon spheres of influence on the 28th of September, allowing Germany to have a greater share of Poland in exchange for Lithuania.


Bernd 12/31/2018 (Mon) 07:41:22 [Preview] No.21777 del
>>21771
Foremost:
>WARNING
I'm looking forward the time when things can be published without such warnings. Sometimes it feels that the last two centuries are pure politics they cannot viewed as history yet, we still don't have the distance.
And now for the content:
I think they mix things up. They mistake a military campaign with a colonization, what the creating the Lebensraum would have been. Not a war, not plundering but creating endless fields of farmlands where strong blond happy Germlings could live and multiply among idyllic pastoral conditions. So yes, colonial in a way, to reply your line.
So the authors of that page is either a bunch of dumbasses who don't know what Lebensraum is or they mix things up on purpose, basically strawmanning.


Bernd 12/31/2018 (Mon) 08:27:25 [Preview] No.21782 del
(242.82 KB 1901x1232 nseurope.JPG)
>>21777
Then Lebensraum was already achieved. They already had German towns in Romania, Poland, Ukraine, the Caucasus, even Turkey. Unless you're saying it was to consolidate influence in Eastern Europe, in which yes, it was partially. Germany wanted Poland and Ukraine though as independent states under German influence though, not a direct annexation.


Bernd 12/31/2018 (Mon) 09:57:09 [Preview] No.21784 del
>>21782
>Then Lebensraum was already achieved
nope, what you say is only handful places, not a considerable population at all. and idk why you say germany didn't want ukraine directly, is it because during the war they were a Reichskommissariat? I really think they would get 're-germanified'


Bernd 12/31/2018 (Mon) 10:31:27 [Preview] No.21786 del
>>21784
>idk why you say germany didn't want ukraine directly, is it because during the war they were a Reichskommissariat?
That and the fact that in WWI, the German Empire wanted to take the Baltic States and Ukraine as independent states under German influence.
>I really think they would get 're-germanified'
I doubt they actually would've taken all of Ukraine as it is portrayed in the usual narrative. The extent they exaggerate it is laughable.


Bernd 12/31/2018 (Mon) 12:29:14 [Preview] No.21788 del
>>21782
Ofc Lebensraum wasn't a new idea the national socialists come up with but older, but it wasn't achieved, surely not from the NSDAP and it's leaders' viewpoint.
In the Mein Kampf (I can't give you exact page number, I have a Hungarian edition, it's in the 14th Chapter, about the eastern politics, I see a subtitle here: "Eastern Politics again, after 600 years") Hitler declares that they have to secure arable lands for the German people and he points to Russia. He literally names her as the land where they have to take over from the Jews which lead her and secure it's soil for the new German leading stratum, which build those countries (which then belonged the the SU) in the past with the workforce of the Slavs.

>>21786
They thought the politics of the 2nd Empire faulty. Source: same as above (Mein Kampf, 14th Chapter abour the eastern politics).


Bernd 12/31/2018 (Mon) 13:48:08 [Preview] No.21794 del
>>21788
>as the land where they have to take over from the Jews
That was regarding the Russian Empire, not the USSR.
>Source: same as above
It just confirms my point that they were trying to only create influence in the east, not territory.


Bernd 12/31/2018 (Mon) 16:07:37 [Preview] No.21796 del
I've read the fourteenth chapter now.
He lays out the need for a territorial extent proportional to a country's population -which Germany lacked- with self-sufficiency in food production and militarily defensible borders.
His ideal of a succesful foreign policy is the Ostsiedlung, as it directly added territory to the fatherland and allowed it to be settled, Germanized and ultimately become an integral German territory.
His view on overseas colonies seems to be that they're not ideal, but are still better than nothing and Germany's enemies have been strengthened by their colonial possesions.
His stance on the moral legitimacy of expansionism is that of might makes right.
He views past German borders as merely temporary results of political maneuvers, and desires to annex at least some land beyond them.
He explicitly says that a revision of borders would require war.

Most importantly, he repeatedly speaks of acquiring new territory to the East.
>Without respect for ‘tradition,’ and without any preconceived notions, the Movement must find the courage to organise our national forces, and set them
on the path which will lead them beyond the confines of the ‘living space’ which is theirs to-day, to the acquisition of new territory.
>From the past we can learn only one lesson, and this is that the aim which is to be pursued in our political conduct must be twofold, namely, (1) the acquisition of territory as the objective of our foreign policy
>It can be solved only by the acquisition of such territory for thesettlement of our people as will extend the area of the mother-country and thereby not only keep the newly-settled population in close touch with the parent-country, but will guarantee the entire territory the enjoyment of those advantages accruing from its total size

And more. This, of course, could be taken to mean "territory" as in "sphere of influence". After all, German settlers could still live in the new Ukrainian/Polish/Baltic puppet states to the East, just as the Japanese settled Manchukuo, fulfilling his vision of a "territory on which our German peasants will one day be able to rear sturdy sons".
But that's not what he seems to be implying. At no moment he speaks of puppet states, indirect control or a sphere of influence, but only the language of annexation and expansion. Furthermore, he shows himself skeptical of allying with liberation movements in other nations:
>The völkisch Movement must not play the advocate for ether nations, but be the protagonist of its own nation. Otherwise it would be superfluous and, above all, it would have no right to clamour against the past, for it would then be repeating the action of the past.
>The old German policy suffered from having been determined by dynastic considerations, the new German policy must not adopt the sentimentally cosmopolitan attitude of völkisch circles.
>Above all, we must not form a police guard for the famous ‘small oppressed nations,’ but we must be the soldiers of the German nation.
And later he also dismisses cooperation with Balkan, Egyptian or Indian nationalists, not just because of their unrealistic expectations but also because
>I, as a nationalist, who estimate the worth of humanity according to racial standards, must, in recognising the inferiority of the so-called ‘oppressed nations’, refuse to link the destiny of my own people with the destiny of theirs.
He includes Russians in this category, and it wouldn't be unfair to presume that he held other Eastern nationalities (except maybe Balts) in the same regard.

I conclude the man was truly thinking of annexing Eastern land at the time he wrote Mein Kampf. This doesn't necessarily mean he still wanted to do that at the time he waged war against the USSR, because he could have changed his mind over the span of twenty years or could have settled for a different policy because of realpolitik, but there's evidence from his own words of annexationist desires.


Bernd 12/31/2018 (Mon) 16:09:53 [Preview] No.21797 del
And citing the Ostsiedlung as his ideal that must be replicated is another evidence he wanted to annex land. A "Mitteleuropa" of Eastern nation-states under German tutelage would be incompatible with a new Ostsiedlung.


Bernd 01/01/2019 (Tue) 08:46:28 [Preview] No.21826 del
>>21794
No. They thought the light/limited approach of the 2nd Empire was wrong.

>>21796
>This doesn't necessarily mean he still wanted to do that at the time he waged war against the USSR, because he could have changed his mind over the span of twenty years or could have settled for a different policy because of realpolitik,
True. They gave up so they could rise into power, maybe they gave up other things. Tho MK was an important part of the ideology of the national socialists and ideologies always can be pulled out on a whim. It doesn't seem like to be any official plan of substantiate anything they concentrated on the war and it's effort. However Lebensraum was a longstanding idea in German "school of thought" it's hard to give up such things, and this is why I listed it as an ideological reason behind attacking the SU. This I post as partly directed to Danish Bernd.
Also I find it cool you checked it.


Bernd 01/01/2019 (Tue) 16:01:53 [Preview] No.21832 del
>>17171
Read 'bout 60 pages from that book. Main problem is with the theory that only circumstantial evidence can be presented. He presents a lot tho.
Obviously we can't have real evidence (e.g. the plans themselves) as:
1. if there were no plans to attack, there won't be any;
2. if they wanted to keep it in secret, it would be hard to find (tho many secrets gets in the open later);
3. if they wanted to cover up (for example they wanted to profit from the victimhood status or seeming innocent, peaceful) then they would have destroyed it.
>Molotov Line
The Wiki article says Suvorov make note of it in his book. I not yet reached that part I think, he mentions the Brest fortress in connection with the NKVD units for sure.
However Suvorov mentiones Kursk where the Soviet managed to create an impenetrable deathtrap in short time. I checked, they built those defenses about two and a half months. They had over 1,5 years in Poland. They clearly didn't build it with the mind on defense. Sounds like a pet project they spent their free time on.
What interesting in that line is that it extends only to the Carpathians. The confrontation zone however goes down to the Black Sea, and this southern area has key importance since from these part they could reach the Romanian oil fields, without them all the shiny machines of the Germans would be scrap-metal.


Bernd 01/02/2019 (Wed) 09:17:18 [Preview] No.21942 del
>>21832

Problem with these theories that plans don't really prove them. Every army of big country has plans for everything, attack, defense, invasions. Especially when generals have time.

So, you can find multiple offensive plans from USSR/USA/whatever, but this doesn't matter that these plans were really considered seriously.

USSR of course had plans for attacking Germany, but pre-war placement of troops doesn't prove that USSR really considered attack, but also doesn't disproves this.

Army was in process of reforms and re-equipment that would be finished in 1942, but would USSR attack in 1942? Maybe, if political situation will force this. Placement of troops near border without proper fortification also isn't a solid proof - it may be sign of mismanagement and slow work.

>However Suvorov mentiones Kursk where the Soviet managed to create an impenetrable deathtrap in short time. I checked, they built those defenses about two and a half months. They had over 1,5 years in Poland.

It isn't fair to compare USSR army of 1941 and 1943. Pre-war situation was much more different, purges, inadequate leadership, overestimation of own power - they had everything. Look at Finnish war for example. In 1943 command chain was replaced multiple times, many old-timers are gone, and high leadership became more sane. And army became much stronger.

I don't try to prove that USSR didn't want to attack, I actually think that attack was more probable than pacifistic defense, but I don't think that USSR would attack even in 1942, only if situation becomes critical.


Bernd 01/02/2019 (Wed) 09:54:30 [Preview] No.21945 del
>>21942
Rather than not taking seriously, as you said every major country has possible war plans against other major countries, they are largely theorical. If I recall right during interar period USA had plan against Britain and her colonies.

Like you I don't say soviets wouldnt attack, I just think they would try to guarantee their victory by waiting.


Bernd 01/02/2019 (Wed) 09:57:16 [Preview] No.21947 del
>>21945
Canada actually had plans to declare war on the US AFTER WWI.


Bernd 01/02/2019 (Wed) 10:02:05 [Preview] No.21948 del
>>21945
>Like you I don't say soviets wouldnt attack, I just think they would try to guarantee their victory by waiting.

I don't think that anyone in pre-WW2 times expected that waiting may help. Germany grew stronger in time, especially after occupation of Europe. More time passed, more industry and integration will appear in occupied zones. Same with USSR, if Germany will wait, Union became stronger after army reforms.

Soviet historiography said that war was inevitable because historical rules etc, and maybe they were right. Waiting was risky.

Although all this is very debatable. Maybe starting war against USSR in 39 would be better for Germany, maybe war would be completely avoided if Hitler stopped for few years, and other unexpected things would happen etc. At least we've seen that warlike situation in 50s (until ICBM became thing) didn't end in war, even when both sides thought about this.

It is very hard to theorize about this realistically.


Bernd 01/02/2019 (Wed) 10:30:40 [Preview] No.21949 del
>>21948
>>21948
>ore time passed, more industry and integration will appear in occupied zones.
They didn't exactly had all raw resources they need, they wanted the finish the war and avoid stalemates for a reason.

I mentioned above why would they wait. Also we always say war is inevitable because of reasons listed, but we forget that both stalin and hitler had highly totalitarian regime and cult of personality, what they personally think was more important than what we estimate. For example chamberlain quickly replaced after making terrible diplomatic mistakes, as their state wasnt totalitarian and had a 'background core' the people heavily affected britains politics behind the screen, I assume I can make sense with these words.



>>21947
Did they? I really only vaguely remember interwar period and possible war plans during that time.


Bernd 01/03/2019 (Thu) 08:05:04 [Preview] No.21998 del
>>21947
>>21949
>>21950
It's just seem silly from our day and age. There were plenty of times prior when the US-Canadian border was crossed by hostile units.


Bernd 01/03/2019 (Thu) 22:12:46 [Preview] No.22004 del
>>21942
Plans are important.
For the critiques of the "Barbarossa was a preventive attack" idea one main card is the absence of direct evidence. Since the Soviet didn't attack the next best thing would be a plan.
I agree armies are tend to make all kinds of plans. But then, where is the Soviet attacking plan? There are miles written on the German ones all over, but noone speaks about the Soviet Unions'. Even Glantz, who mentioned in the Wiki article above as one of the main opposer of Suvorov's book, only mentions a defensive plan and an "answering strike" plan in his books (checked: Barbarossa: Hitler's Invasion of Russia, 1941 and Barbarossa Derailed Volume 1.). If they planned for all possibilities where is the explicit attacking one? Unless they made exceptional steps to keep it hush hush there should be one.
So then no attack, no plan, only circumstantial stuff remains.
Btw, just found out that Zhukov sent a proposal to Stalin for a Soviet preventive attack, Timoshenko initialed it, but not sure Stalin saw it - found in another book of Glantz (The Soviet-German War 1941-1945, Myths and Realities), sadly the book doesn't say much on the debate.
>It isn't fair to compare USSR army of 1941 and 1943. Pre-war situation was much more different
Ofc they have the luxury of working in peace without getting shot at. All right, seriously if the time difference would be a few months then ok, they fiddled too much and had problems, but it's over 1.5 year. The Soviet could build and construct very efficiently, especially if it was about army and war.
This is similar to the officer problem. Due to the great cleansing the Red Army lacked in experienced officers. But that was 3 years before '41. Since then they went through at least a war against fortified Finland, a Blitzkrieg against Japan, and the occupation of the Baltics and part of Romania, then Poland. I don't think the Soviet officers didn't know their job by the time of Barbarossa.


Bernd 01/07/2019 (Mon) 20:34:19 [Preview] No.22149 del
I'm at about the half of Suvorov's book, but in the meantime I looked into David Glantz's Barbarossa Derailed too. I wrote here >>21732 what I read in the Icebreaker that Germans were idiots and didn't know obvious things... I found in Glantz's work the other side of the coin.
Read and be amazed (Chapter 1 page 21):
Soviet War Planning: Defense Plan-41 (DP-41) and the “Answering” Strike
Ironically, the infamous Ribbentrop-Molotov Non-Aggression Pact, which Stalin negotiated with Hitler in August 1939, actually contributed to the catastrophic defeat the Red Army suffered during the initial stages of Operation Barbarossa. By signing the infamous pact, Stalin hoped to forestall possible German aggression against the Soviet Union and, while doing so, create a “buffer” or security zone by seizing eastern Poland and the Baltic States. However, the subsequent Soviet invasion and occupation of eastern Poland in September 1939 and the Baltic States in the fall of 1940 brought the Soviet Union into direct contact with German-occupied territory.
So what basically Glantz says, that they wanted to create a buffer zone (what was already existed in the form of the countries between Germany and the SU), but the Soviet leaders didn't know the SU will border Germany with the occupation of Poland.


Bernd 01/08/2019 (Tue) 08:49:01 [Preview] No.22161 del
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>>22004
>For the critiques of the "Barbarossa was a preventive attack" idea one main card is the absence of direct evidence. Since the Soviet didn't attack the next best thing would be a plan.

We need to distinguish between "common" military plans, i.e. something like "in case of offensive on west border that division goes there and there" and large scale plans (like Barbarossa). Barbarossa was that plan, USSR had nothing (although it is debatable because there are much secrecy even today), but that type of plan made when decision is almost made too. USSR knew that war is very probable, but modernization of army planned to finish in 42, and there is no need to make serious plan until that happens. Or plan will be outdated in fast-changing world of 40s.

I guess Suvorov and his supporters say about global thing, like USSR would attack Germany, not about specific plan with numbers and arrows.

>but it's over 1.5 year. The Soviet could build and construct very efficiently, especially if it was about army and war.
>Due to the great cleansing the Red Army lacked in experienced officers. But that was 3 years before '41

I also have Zhukov's book (although it is memoirs, not historical work), he represents "official" post-Stalin position. He clearly says that officers were undereducated and unprepared, pre-war organization was flawed (like when communication in war situation must be done by local NKVD, but they couldn't do anything properly when war started). He wrote much about defenses and said that they weren't properly finished even according to 41's plan. Railroad modernization plan at "new" territories was completely failed in 40-41 etc.

Also purges didn't stop in 37, they continued to Stalin's death, although after Beria replaced Ezhov scale of repressions became smaller.


Bernd 01/11/2019 (Fri) 20:16:24 [Preview] No.22281 del
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>>22161
You are right, strategic plans and operational plans are different. Would be right to assume some plans never existed only in Stalin's head as mostly he was the state himself, like Louis XIV just in another color, and the will of the state and people.
Suvorov in Chapter 19 writes about "red envelopes" which were waited at the army HQs in a safe for opening, containing instructions needed to be carried out when the order arrived. In the next chapter he writes about a thing he calls 5th May directives which seems to be the same as the red envelopes. He doesn't make the equation explicitly tho, this is my conclusion.
Nevertheless in relation to the envelopes he says the order to open them never came but some commanders still did it as the Germans began the attack and looked for instructions they could use. They found none, what they read, it was useless. We only know this - he says - and the actual contents are still unknown.
About the 5th May directives he writes the commanders were ordered to wait for further instruction because something extraordinary turn will come in the future and only read then. He speculates about it's contents, why couldn't be a defense order, or several orders for different scenarios, and why it had to be an offensive set of instructions.

I read Zhukov memoirs too (or most of it I don't remember now exactly), my grandparents have it. In my possession I have Kamanin's летчики и космонавты (in Hun. ofc) which I also read. The first half that is, and a little from the cosmonaut part. What I can clearly recall - as it felt odd - that both books sounded exactly the same, as if one person wrote it. Maybe the translation and the military jargon do that, maybe these were written along certain expectations how they should sound, but I pretty much can imagine about the Soviet regime and propaganda machine that it ordered these books to be written and were written by shadow-writers using the same schematics. Nevertheless as you mentioned Zhukov's memoirs represents the "official" post-Stalin position, which frankly the same as the previous one in this topic, the Soviet Union can't be an aggressor. E.g. it took them 50 years and the collapse of the SU to admit Katyn Kurwa. So basically Zhukov in his book invents excuses why the Red Army was unable to stop the Germans until Moscow.

Suvorov says about the "Molotov line" that it had dual purpose. One, they were offensive fortifications, basically strong points which can be held by small force and can offer fire support in the very first step of the attack. Two, as they were built right on the border, in the open where everyone could see it, they were a show for the Germans to mislead them into thinking that the Soviet prepares for defense. This intention is failed - he says - as the Germans did the same thing on their side (and what the Germans prepared for? an offense). Suvorov also mentions that back in 39 in the East, Zhukov did the exact same thing, the difference was that the Japans were misled successfully.


Bernd 01/11/2019 (Fri) 20:21:12 [Preview] No.22282 del
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Elsewhere in Icebreaker the author touches an important thing. And it's the rhethoric of the bolsheviks/communists/marxists which western writers constantly misunderstand. I think he is kinda right. The communists didn't (don't) exactly mean the same when they talk about something. Or rather they have a special view on things and have different definitions than normal people have. Most known example when they say liberation they think occupation. Or when they occupy a country, they say they liberated it (I'll get back to this in a minute). It's like Orwell's 1984: war is peace, freedom is slavery, ignorance is strength.
For the communist there's two types of war. An aggressive unjust, and a defensive just. An imperialist state only can wage unjust wars, all they do is aggression, oppressed states, oppressed people's war however always just. Oppressed people, the proletariat, defends and liberates itself through these wars. And when the Soviet Union attacks a country, normal people (the reactionary imperialist oppressors) only see a sovereign country attacking another sovereign country and occupying it (like it happened with the Baltic states) but for the communist it's just the proletariat liberates itself from another country's bourgeois oppression. Because for the communist not one nation exists (he is internationalist) only proletarians and bourgeois, he sees the whole world's proletariat one body whereupon the imperialists built their states separating them from each other. In the Soviet Union there's no bourgeois so they have the arms for the self liberation of the workers in other countries.
So when the communists talked about preparing for defense that didn't meant they prepared for defending their own country, but defending the proletariat from the imperialist aggression, the proletariat of Europe, west from the Soviet Union. Translated to normal people's language: they prepared to attack Germany.

What I really don't like in Suvorovs book is the abhorrent way of handling sources. He gives a Bibliography, but no footnotes or endnotes. He frequently use inline source notations but only for quotes or other lines where he paraphrase something. He presents a bunch of data without any support, for example the talks about the BT tanks and their capabilities but doesn't give anything where he got these details. Ofc I can look it up in other books if he talks about legit stuff, or on that site Turkish Bernd posted, but wtf, these things supposed to be there.


Bernd 01/24/2019 (Thu) 18:50:51 [Preview] No.22744 del
I soon finish the Icebreaker, I'm at somewhere in the last chapter. Supposedly, as I have it in two formats, probably different editions, or rather different edits, and what I read might missing a chapter and the "Conclusion".
So I already mentioned I don't like how badly he treats the sources, but there's something else. Sometimes he uses superlatives, inflates certain aspects of the circumstances to make more believable what he writes.
Nevertheless he puts forward many arguments, might be worthy to check the truth of them if it's possible.
One more thing: he gives the date of the Soviet attack, and that's July 6, 1941. He builds some reasoning behind but it feels flimsy.


Bernd 01/25/2019 (Fri) 06:32:16 [Preview] No.22762 del
>>22744
Heh, was on the last page.


Bernd 01/25/2019 (Fri) 21:48:39 [Preview] No.22784 del
>>22744
>July 6, 1941
How does he explain it?


Bernd 01/25/2019 (Fri) 21:51:51 [Preview] No.22785 del
>>22784
It was Sunday.


Bernd 01/25/2019 (Fri) 22:05:47 [Preview] No.22786 del
>>22785
That's his reason for why Stalin would initiate his drive towards the Pyrenees on that day?


Bernd 01/25/2019 (Fri) 22:15:00 [Preview] No.22788 del
>>22786
Yes.
So basically the most of the book is partially about that the attack would start sometimes summer, not even in autumn. The Soviet military buildup culminated in the spring of '41, and the established two echelons, a bigger first one which main job was seizing/destroying the Romanian oil fields while simultaneously driving a punch into Germany, then the smaller second echelon could arrive and drive further to the west (with the start of the war mobilization would follow gaining millions of soldiers, and the new units would have been equipped by all those factories which were captured/destroyed by the war in our timeline by the Germans).
The concentration of the Second Strategic Echelon would have been completed on July 10. But the Soviet military theory ordains that the offense should start before the completion of this. And "Zhukov and Stalin liked to deliver their surprise strikes on Sunday mornings". The last Sunday before 10 July was on the 6th.
A certain General Ivanov said: "The German troops succeeded in forestalling us literally by two weeks".


Bernd 01/25/2019 (Fri) 22:18:40 [Preview] No.22789 del
>>22788
Oh and the reason why they should attack earlier is that the second echelon could be hauled by trains into the already captured enemy territory, so it could faster arrive to the front.


Bernd 01/25/2019 (Fri) 22:28:37 [Preview] No.22790 del
>>22788
>General Ivanov
Most likely this guy:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semyon_Ivanov


Bernd 01/26/2019 (Sat) 16:12:34 [Preview] No.22801 del
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>>22790
Yeah it's that guy.
From the book:
General of the Army, Simion Pavlovich Ivanov, then a colonel in charge of the operations branch of the 13th Army headquarters
The date of 10 July was written by Suvorov like this:
...The Soviet troop movements began in February. They were stepped up in March, reached enormous proportions in April and May, and became truly all-embracing in June. These movements involved those divisions which had already been moved up close to the German frontier; those which were preparing to invade Iran; and those which had remained in the Far East. The full build-up of Soviet troops on the German frontier was planned to have been completed by 10 july.
He accredit this data to General Ivanov, and gives the source: ''Nachalnyi Period
Voiny, Moscow Voenizdat 1974, p. 211'', but he doesn't quote him (at other places he does) so I dunno which part of this was actually written by Ivanov. Maybe just the date.


Bernd 01/26/2019 (Sat) 19:01:58 [Preview] No.22803 del
>>22801

Here is that part of Ivanov's book (in Russian though): http://militera.lib.ru/science/npv/08.html

He says that phrase (two weeks) about movement and redeployment of Soviet forces that started some time before the war as answer to German forces movement.


Bernd 01/26/2019 (Sat) 21:46:23 [Preview] No.22811 del
>>22803
Awesome!
Here's the date.
"Переброска войск из внутренних округов осуществлялась железнодорожным транспортом с соблюдением маскировки и без нарушения графика движения мирного времени. Войска должны были завершить сосредоточение в заранее намеченные районы с 1 июня по 10 июля 1941 г."
According to google translate, this says:
The transfer of troops from the internal districts was carried out by railway transport with observance of masking and without violating the schedule of peacetime. The troops were supposed to complete concentration in prearranged areas from June 1 to July 10, 1941.
"observance of masking" I would go with: "cover" or "cover story" or something.
Breddy gud.


Bernd 02/03/2019 (Sun) 20:26:58 [Preview] No.22998 del
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Maybe I'm quiet nowadays but started to gather the arguments of the Icebreaker, to make a tl;dr sum. It takes longer than I thought.


Bernd 02/04/2019 (Mon) 13:44:11 [Preview] No.23003 del
>>22998
>"Joey Steel"

Imagine the pain Russians and Ukraine would have avoided if the camera man there had blasted that kikes brains all over the wall.

Too bad, no guts, they took a lot of pictures of their own decimation.


Bernd 02/04/2019 (Mon) 16:56:27 [Preview] No.23008 del
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>>23003
>kikes
Georgian. He was America's fault all along.
Made me wonder how different things would have played out if someone removed him. From here they were all sack of shits, one more deranged then the other and schemers all. Was he really an unreplaceable evil genius? Khrushchev seems like a grey mouse compared, but maybe the times made him look different, he played an other role. But back then, after Lenin death there was still Trotsky too and many more who later was erased.
Ofc the question can be asked if the "great historical figures" shape history or is it made of impersonal processes that flow on their course.


Bernd 02/04/2019 (Mon) 17:50:20 [Preview] No.23009 del
>>23008
Georgian jews are one of the oldest ethnic groups in Georgia, dating back to the captivity by Babylon. What makes you think Yosef Jugashvili wasn't one?


Bernd 02/04/2019 (Mon) 18:21:15 [Preview] No.23010 del
>>23009
Actchually I don't need to disprove something what needs to be proved first. I'm not the one with the burden of proofs.


Bernd 02/04/2019 (Mon) 18:25:12 [Preview] No.23011 del
>>23008

WTF is that shit I am not even clicking on that crap. Looks like something your kid drew?! My parrot makes better memes and he is legless and blind.

As to OP's question, well duh, of course it was a Jewish trick, and that's why it is so satisfying to pull out of Syria and let Russia and Israel knock the shit out of each other because they can't co exist without the USA as a foil. Watch what happens.

Russia will invade Israel right after they invade Turkey. Well, between Israel and Russia, it's a race to conquer Turkey. I say USA stays out of it, this is not our fight.


Bernd 02/04/2019 (Mon) 19:01:25 [Preview] No.23012 del
>>23011
Does he paint with his feet?


Bernd 02/04/2019 (Mon) 19:12:11 [Preview] No.23013 del
>>23010
Well, the truth is that there's no actual proof he was one, just speculation.


Bernd 02/04/2019 (Mon) 19:33:46 [Preview] No.23014 del
>>23013
I've never heard/read any speculation about him being a Jew. He pretty much was suspicious of the Jews for their conspiratory nature and banding together. Heard somewhere he accused Kaganovich that he is a Jew first and communist only second. He was anti-zionist and anti-Israel. I've no idea how speculations could exist about him.
About Hitler, I know of it. About Mao, that too.


Bernd 02/04/2019 (Mon) 21:09:15 [Preview] No.23015 del
I've found an essay on the subject from a source that is naturally biased towards concluding that he's a Jew, but ultimately rejects the thesis:
https://www.counter-currents.com/2012/11/was-stalin-jewish-and-does-it-matter/

Most of the arguments for his Jewishness are onomastic, pointing to his and his close ones' names as evidence. However, a closer look at etymologies show those claims are very weak.

>Turning to Mr. Tarrell’s article as a cogent point of reference, his first contention is that Stalin, born Iosif Vissarionovich Dzugashvili, had been given a name that would have been unthinkable for a non-Jew in Czarist Russia: Iosip (Joseph).[4] The question arises, however, as to why the christening of Gentiles with Old Testament names in Czarist Russian would be “unthinkable,” since the Orthodox Russian tradition is also drawn from the Old Testament? Rather, Iosip is a variation of Iosif, which is the Russian, Romanian, and Greek form of Joseph.[5] Another Russian variation is Osip. The “p” in Iosip can be found in various European languages. The Hebrew version is rendered as Yosef.[6]

>Terrall states of Stalin’s given middle name, Vissarionovich, that “there is evidence that the name Vissarion is a Jewish name. For example, Vissarion Bielinsky was a Jewish writer in Russia…”[11] Vissarion is derived from Greek, Bessarion, and means “who he gives new life.” His father’s name was spelled Besarion.

>The primary case for Stalin’s alleged Jewish origins is that his name Dzugashvili (variant: Jughashvili) means “son of a Jew” in Georgian, Dzu supposedly meaning “Jew.” Terrall states a relatively widely believed claim that “Dzu means Jew.” However, according to Montefieore, the name means “son of Juga.” Montefiroe states that the name is derived either from Ossetian, meaning “herd” or Georgian (djuga) meaning “steel.”[12] The latter Georgian meaning would surely account for the adoption of “Stalin,” “Man of Steel,” by Iosif Vissarionovich.

>Stalin’s great grandson, Jacob Jugashvili, writes:

>There is no word Jew for Jews in the Georgian language. . . . Jew in Georgian is Ebraeli, so the theory of “son of a Jew” (which is very tempting considering our name in light of its English spelling) is simply, wrong.[13]

>Of this “Jew” sounding part of the name, Jacob Jugashvili explains that usually the surname is written is Russian as Dzhugashvili because there is no “j” in the Russian alphabet, so Russian uses the letters “d” and “zh.”[14]

>>23011
>Russia will invade Israel right after they invade Turkey. Well, between Israel and Russia, it's a race to conquer Turkey.
Nothing will happen at all. Bibi, Erdo and Putin have other concerns.


Bernd 02/04/2019 (Mon) 21:57:15 [Preview] No.23016 del
>>23015
>Does it Matter?
Every detail matters. Maybe future historians with a different angle, different mindset than we have will need the data if he was or wasn't. But ofc this can be said about everything.
More important question: what did he gain from making his Jewish origin a secret if he was?


Bernd 02/05/2019 (Tue) 05:01:16 [Preview] No.23021 del
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>>23008
>Made me wonder how different things would have played out if someone removed him.

It depends on time and who would replace him. For example, Beria was a pretty liberal person (in original sense of course) and may do many different reforms to USSR, although he was part of Stalin's team and would be removed from power at any anti-Stalin coup (and it happened).

Considering Stalin's Jewishness - it is hard to tell. Of course there is always a theory that every ruler of USSR/Russia (and not only) was a Jew. But for Stalin proofs are pretty weak (Khazarian ancestry, Jewish wifes, "Koba" nickname), although it is debatable, and many proofs look suspicious.


Bernd 02/05/2019 (Tue) 16:22:10 [Preview] No.23028 del
>>23021
>Beria was a pretty liberal person (in original sense of course) and may do many different reforms to USSR
Even decades prior to his death?

>every ruler of USSR/Russia (and not only) was a Jew.
Some joge, when two Jews are having a chat and one says he reads anti-Semitic newspapers.
- Why? - asks the other.
- Full of good news! According to this we rule the world!


Bernd 02/05/2019 (Tue) 20:48:34 [Preview] No.23035 del
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>>23011
>Russia will invade Israel right after they invade Turkey
Putin and Netanyahu aren't even enemies though. The only reason they've been clashing is because of Syria.


Bernd 02/05/2019 (Tue) 21:59:46 [Preview] No.23037 del
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>>23028
>>Beria was a pretty liberal person (in original sense of course) and may do many different reforms to USSR
>Even decades prior to his death?

It is hard to say. In 1937 he stopped mass scale repressions. In 1953 he released million of prisoners, banned prisoners torture, had an initiative to remove passport controls etc. Maybe it was only a way to survive in post-Stalin world (and looks like it was only this).

It didn't help him and he was shot though.

Considering possibility of death of Stalin - yes, it is pretty complex question, who would be leader and how history would turn. Pre-purge and pre-war commie party was pretty much different compared to post-war.

It is common concept that person couldn't shape history, and turning points of historical process is inevitable (especially in Soviet historiographical paradigm), but I don't think so (although can't prove this of course). Maybe even miss of that guy in 1914 could prevent the war and change history completely.


Bernd 02/06/2019 (Wed) 06:42:13 [Preview] No.23038 del
>>23037
How these guys of pre-Khrushchev era (with Khrushchev since he was active participant those times) are treated in Russia now? How they teach about them, what's the "official" state opinion, how people think about them?
I know in Germany Hitler is treated literally worse than Hitler, but certain military figures, even the SS, gets better treatment, acknowledging their military accomplishments is somewhat more socially acceptable. I also know about many Russian's nostalgic feelings toward the SU, and the ban of the movie Death of Stalin.


Bernd 02/06/2019 (Wed) 10:15:28 [Preview] No.23040 del
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>>23038

Official position is pretty shady. On one side, government and Putin condemns gulags, and repressions, on other side, Stalin and his government aren't demonized, nor his enemies though (Trotsky). When I was in school, they mostly concentrated on industrialization and pre-war times, and skipped complex questions. Anti-stalinist trend started in 60s, but culminated in late 80s.

Modern Russian state tries to sit on two chairs, Soviet and Imperial, and this is eclectic and hypocritical. Society is more Soviet-oriented, because USSR destroyed most that Russian Empire had in cultural terms. Although it is fun to see commies on orthodox processions, overall it is pretty sad view.

Considering people - it depends, most of people don't hate Stalin, but it is mostly not about Stalin as is, but about modern times. Seeing how government officials rob everything and live in luxury obviously reminds about stalinist methods of fixing corruption. Stalin's popularity slowly rising in last few years because of these reasons and also because overall rise in patriotic feelings.

About other people - Kirov, Trotsky or whoever - no one cares.


Bernd 02/06/2019 (Wed) 17:17:19 [Preview] No.23046 del
>>23040
So Russia is still in the phase when she can't say the shit is stinky. Not an easy position. Also those proverbial chairs are really uncomfortable.
Slowly generations who lived in the communist era will start to die out, and only those remain who were born after the collapse. Since they will only know the current system they won't have nostalgic feelings toward the SU. On the other hand they could gain an idealized, glorified picture of CCCP which has not much common with the reality. It would be important to give them a knowledge which is closer the the latter.


Bernd 02/06/2019 (Wed) 19:41:59 [Preview] No.23049 del
>>23046
>Slowly generations who lived in the communist era will start to die out, and only those remain who were born after the collapse. Since they will only know the current system they won't have nostalgic feelings toward the SU. On the other hand they could gain an idealized, glorified picture of CCCP which has not much common with the reality.

It already works as in second case - the most pro-Soviet people are people who didn't really lived in USSR and have some strange utopian image of it. Of course there are pensioners who still think about "old times", but they aren't really USSR-lovers as media portrays them.

And modern state of the world also brings questions, i.e. if everything is going into unfunny shit (especially Europe, that was beacon of good life for Russians for ages), it is attractive to question current system (i.e. globalistic capitalism) and support some alternative. USSR is the closest alternative thing that average Russian (and not only Russian) could imagine.


Bernd 02/08/2019 (Fri) 18:24:31 [Preview] No.23076 del
>>23049
Right now Europe is still doing fine all considered. In every day and age were always warning voices and the future always looked uncertain. Right now too, only the challenges we face are different. How we perceive things the media has strong influence on it - if we, personally don't follow media outlets so much, those whom we interact with still do and they relay it -, otherwise we just see a little slice of the world day by day. If Europe is a model example for Russia then the Russian media should be careful with the picture it paints for the people. Tho the best propaganda machine is the one which can turn people's opinion in a minute from friendly to hostile and back on demand.



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