Optical Computing vs Quantum Computing Anonymous 04/16/2018 (Mon) 02:34:21 No.12648 del
LIGHT: How optical processing can solve some of the world’s most complex problems.
https://www.labs.hpe.com/next-next/light
>Beausoleil spent about a decade working on quantum computing. That’s when he experimented with chips made out of diamonds. His team found that it was too difficult to create enough diamond chips that had exactly the same qualities, making it impossible to manufacture them in a repeatable and predictable way. This particular approach to building a quantum computer wouldn’t scale.
>Beausoleil concluded that photonic technology offered a faster and more practical route to success than building an actual quantum computer. “When somebody does manage to create a true quantum system with entanglement, that’s going to be awesome,” Beausoleil says. “Right now, we’re leaving that one on the table and just trying to take advantage of coherence.”
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>Optical computing is an emerging field with experimental components. The challenge is to raise the yield of working components to a commercially viable level. The Labs approach is to create a round of equipment, test it to identify flaws, then determine necessary changes in the chip design or manufacturing method.
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>Labs researchers are also exploring new applications for their optical circuits. For example, they’ve designed a system called an energy minimization computer that changes the state of an optical circuit to find the configuration that consumes the least amount of energy. This concept applies perfectly to solving NP-hard problems like the traveling salesman.
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>This technology won’t replace general-purpose electronic computers, because lots of problems aren’t NP-hard problems. But a photonic system-on-a-chip could be used as an accelerator running alongside a CPU in a conventional computer. Emerging computing platforms like The Machine, a next-generation system under development at Hewlett Packard Labs, offer even more intriguing possibilities. The Machine will hold huge amounts of data in memory and allow users to plug in different processors as needed, depending on the type of computation they want to perform.
>This technology won’t replace general-purpose electronic computers...
I still haven't learned why this would be the case.