Bernd 10/13/2017 (Fri) 12:53:41 No. 11153 del
I'd still rather post things like this on imageboards than start a blog:

<I find that memory is heavily associative -- when I'm prepared to speak in English, it somehow cuts my mental association to most concepts that I mainly know in the context of Finnish. It's like a complete gear shift, where the two languages can't meet. Speaking in English I sometimes couldn't be put on the spot to recall even basic things like catchy song lyrics in Finnish unless they're already in my near memory. That is, recalling from your vast pool of experience is in itself something that requires a certain level of talent to perform with immediacy, but its curious how that works specifically in a single side of the language barrier. This makes me wonder if in fact every word we speak somehow reminds us of every other word we know, but only within the same langauge. It's strictly a matter of semiotics, I do recall abstract concepts of course but the appropriate signifiers don't come to me easily from separate languages, although I'm trained for them to come quite easily as long as I only have to speak in either language, but then I can do it at great length without stuttering or looking for the correct word. This time I was trying to translate in my a head a figurative reference to calvinism somebody was using, and how to say the same thing to a Finn, but I couldn't for the life of me remember the name of laestadionism although Finnish armchair politicians talk about them all the fucking time. I just haven't ever heard that word in an English sentence, so while my brain was primed to English the word for laestadionism didn't exist for me.